Browse by Theme: Engaging Men & Boys

#MeToo began with the bravery of individual women not willing to be silenced about their experiences of sexual harassment and abuse. Their voices have become a global movement exposing the systemic nature of sexism and male entitlement in all industries and countries. And, with #AidToo, #LabourToo and #MosqueMeToo, the movement has shown that no section of work or society is immune.

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At CARE we believe that a good humanitarian response has to respond to anyone in need, regardless of their gender. This comes with an understanding that greater priority must be given to women and girls due to entrenched gender inequalities. But when the world is impacted by an unprecedented refugee crisis and the vast majority of lone refugees are adolescent boys and men, are we really understanding and responding to their unique assistance and protection needs?

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Research shows that addressing intimate partner violence (IPV) requires working at society, community, household and individual levels to promote relationships built on respect, equality and peace. This blog shares the emerging learnings of working specifically with couples to address IPV in the context of Rwanda and speaks to the findings of the qualitative research conducted by Dr Erin Stern from London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (read more in this article by Dr Erin Stern and Ritha Nyiratunga).

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The Harvey Weinstein case has caused an enormous outburst of anger and concern on the issue of sexual harassment, particularly in the world of work. While piecemeal suggestions have emerged as to how to improve the protection of women (and men), little public attention has yet been paid on a major global initiative to address this very problem – the potential ILO Convention on Ending violence and harassment against women and men in the world of work.

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Preventing intimate partner violence (IPV) won’t happen overnight. It requires a lengthy process of social change, and achieving that requires both time and funding investment.

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Women in CARE Ghana’s PROMISE programme eat three times more soybeans than they did in 2012, and are four times more likely to be involved in household decision-making. Find out how.

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By Gianluca Nardi and Katherine Carr (CARE International UK, Programme Officer - Africa)

When we arrive in Kariyata, a rural community in the Upper Eastern region of Ghana, close to Garu, most of the women in the community are waiting for us within a circle of shea trees that they normally use for meetings, and some men are also there, although in a separate group. The community is partly Christian and partly Muslim and partly followers of traditional religions and all of them are there for one reason: to talk about gender.

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