Browse by Theme: Refugees

Yesterday (22 September 2014) at the UN General Assembly in New York, John Kerry, US Secretary of State, convened a ministerial meeting to review progress on the Call to Action on Violence Against Women and Girls in Emergencies. What were the highlights and key points? And what needs to happen to get the Call to Action out of the ‘gender silo’ and into the heart of wider humanitarian reforms ahead of the World Humanitarian Summit in 2016?

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As world leaders meet at the UN General Assembly, US Secretary of State John Kerry is holding a high-level review of the global ‘Call to Action on Violence Against Women and Girls in Emergencies’. But what is the best way to hold donors and aid agencies accountable for the commitments they have made on gender issues?

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CARE had a big role at the Global Summit to End Sexual Violence in Conflict in June – and you’ve read on Insights what we think the Summit achieved, and what are the challenges ahead. But what is CARE doing now to turn the talk into action?

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CARE's conference on Women, Migration and Development (July 2014), organised in partnership with the Overseas Development Institute, examined the extent to which migrants the world over suffer stigma and discrimination. The conference included a session on the media and its role and responsibility in shaping policy and opinion on migration. Delegates discussed the way in which negative portrayal of migrants in the media contributes significantly to reinforcing prejudices and presents a big obstacle to challenging negative attitudes and stereotyping around migration.

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Syrian refugees fleeing the now 3-year-old conflict have faced rape during raids by security forces, and rape and sexual assault is so prevalent that women and girl refugees cited it as the main reason they left their country. Yet when they arrive to their supposed sanctuary and refuge, they are faced with the prospect of sexual violence and harassment at a communal toilet block.

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The right to work for refugees is vital. In fact, increasing the economic opportunities for refugees is the only way in which they can become autonomous and productive, escape from long-term limbo and prevent them from being a burden on the state. But this is just one of the ways in which refugees can be supported, and providing the right to work is not an excuse for states to avoid their responsibilities to help people in need. Fundamentally, there needs to be political will and collaboration around a range of interventions and support to resolve refugee crises and an equitable resettlement arrangement should be a part of this.

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As Conflict Policy Advisor for CARE International UK, I'm currently in Amman, Jordan, responding to the crisis in Syria. Now, as Kuwait II or the Second International Humanitarian Pledging Conference for Syria comes to a close I'm taking the opportunity to review the conference, as well as the expectations and hopes of humanitarian agencies like CARE.

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