Browse by Theme: Women's Economic Empowerment

The World Bank is starting to put the money behind its thinking on Fragile States. However, as a 10-year evaluation of its work in fragile and conflict affected states shows, getting the finance might have been the easy part.

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Today marks the start of the 16 Days of Activism against Gender Violence, which focuses for 2013 on the theme of militarism. The past year has seen the British Government and others make sexual violence as a weapon of war a political priority as never before – with a particular focus on seeking prosecutions to end impunity for such crimes.

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There’s an inescapable buzz around the role of business in international development. Everywhere I go—from Bangladesh to East Africa, from the flurry of activity of the UNGA or CGI in New York to the WEF Annual meeting in Davos—it’s a topic that has risen to the very top of the development agenda.

To be clear, CARE welcomes this long-awaited energy and momentum. But business still has a long way to go, particularly when it comes to understanding the importance and specific needs of women—both as customers and as critical participants in supply chains.

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Perhaps, you're hoping to break into the development sector, or you are looking for a career change from the private sector? Maybe you want to build your CV while completing your post graduate studies or want to learn more about the world of microfinance and influencing policy makers? If so, an internship in the Advocacy and Policy Team at CARE UK might be just what you are looking for. Here are five reasons why we think you should apply:

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Debate on the possibilities at the base of the pyramid (BOP) is ubiquitous; nonetheless, too often regulated to a post-script is that frequently when we refer to the BOP what we actually mean is women at the BOP.  It’s time to stop discussing the BOP as a single, homogenous entity and start looking more specifically at what it will mean to engage with women as producers and as consumers.

Apart from some notable exceptions, the most oft-cited evidence for the business case for gender equality tends to focus disproportionately on large, western companies in the formal sector. Far less visible are examples that demonstrate why companies should-or how they can- act on Women’s Empowerment Principle 5: “implement enterprise development, supply chain and marketing practices that empower women.”

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