Development Blog

At the end of 2016 the Doing Development Differently community held a workshop to take stock. What have we learned over the past two years? Is anything actually different?

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Young women in Mali: could Doing Development Differently improve food security for people in countries like Mali? Young women in Mali: could Doing Development Differently improve food security for people in countries like Mali?

CARE’s programmes on dignified work have for a number of years included training sessions for women in factories. Recent research provides further evidence, backing up our own findings, that investing in training for women workers makes good business sense for factory owners.

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Workers at a garment factory in Cambodia Workers at a garment factory in Cambodia

The Fourth Industrial Revolution (4IR) is upon us. Too much to be excited about, right? Or, like me, you may still be wrapping your head around what this revolution means...

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Young women in Jordan who receive vocational and business skills training to help them set up microenterprises Young women in Jordan who receive vocational and business skills training to help them set up microenterprises

One of the trendiest buzzwords in the development and humanitarian sector at the moment is “adaptive management”, which carries heavy weight in focusing on MEAL practices while remaining neutral to political forces and the increased commercial pressures on aid spending. But what does adaptive management mean in practice and what are the key considerations to bear in mind in relation to programme design and implementation?

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An information point for recipients of cash transfers in Zimbabwe An information point for recipients of cash transfers in Zimbabwe

Cash programming has been under the cosh from certain sections of the media – so it will be interesting to see the response to the latest report from the Independent Commission for Aid Impact, published today (12 January 2017), which gives a strong endorsement to DFID’s cash programmes and how they deliver on poverty reduction.

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“With the cash transfer ... my family survived the drought so far," says Concilia Sande in Zimbabwe “With the cash transfer ... my family survived the drought so far," says Concilia Sande in Zimbabwe

In my line of work we all feel passionately about creating greater gender equality globally, and for CARE and many others, achieving greater women’s economic empowerment is a major goal. But how good are we at keeping our own houses in order when it comes to flexible working?

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Job share: where two minds are better than one… Two women share a task in Niger. Job share: where two minds are better than one… Two women share a task in Niger.

Since starting an internship at CARE International UK in the Policy and Advocacy team, I’ve had the chance to support research on women’s economic empowerment programmes, with a specific focus on the ready-made garment sector in South East Asia. CARE’s broader role in training value chain workers in partnership with companies like Mondelez, establishing savings groups with women, and committing to a Dignified Work agenda, is crucial to tackling widespread injustice in global value chains across all industries. Researching ready-made garment value chains specifically has led me to re-evaluate some of my own shopping habits, and shown me that change has to come from consumers.

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A garment worker in Cambodia A garment worker in Cambodia