Laurie Lee

Laurie Lee

Role: Chief Executive

Profile:

Laurie joined CIUK as Chief Executive in August 2014. He was previously Director, Africa, for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, where he led the Foundation’s team working on policy, advocacy and government relations in Africa. Prior to 2008, Laurie was a civil servant in the UK Government, mainly in the Department for International Development (DFID), in which his last position was Deputy Director and Head of the International Trade Department. From 2004 to 2006 Laurie served as Deputy Director and Foreign Policy Adviser on Africa to Prime Minister Tony Blair. Laurie’s other experience includes working as DFID’s programme manager for Afghanistan and South Africa, and serving as a UK negotiator on African issues in the European Union.

Blog posts

CARE International UK's CEO Laurie Lee and Senior Policy Advisor Howard Mollett outline recommendations from CARE towards the Global Summits on Refugees launched on World Refugee

CARE staff in the UK and across the world are devastated at the news of the murder of Jo Cox (formerly Jo

Currently an average of only 0.2% of global humanitarian aid goes directly to local or national NGOs and civil society organisations. Multiple studies have shown that local capacity is often significantly underutilised, undervalued and overlooked

I met several Syrians in Jordan and Turkey during a recent visit (mid-January). All of them said they just

Ahead of the Syria conference in London in early February, donors and governments in the region are working closely to agree a new plan for

Blog by Laurie Lee and Ramil Burden (Vice President, Africa and developing countries, GSK):

In the north eastern corner of Bangladesh lies Sunamganj district. A remote area that is underwater for almost half of the year,

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are the first time a global compact on overcoming poverty has been created in the digital age. Harnessing the promise of technology will be key to transforming poverty and power in the next 15 years, but

The real challenge for the new Sustainable Development Goals is what happens after they are agreed. Deciding on the goals and targets is only the first step; backing them up with the commitment to implement them is crucial. The emerging consensus

A ground-breaking piece of development progress was marked last month when the World Bank updated its financial inclusion database and revealed that in the last three

Where culture is a major barrier to women accessing health care, engaging men in community-based development is an effective way to increase women’s access to health – and promote women’s empowerment more generally – even in contexts

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