Commission on the Status of Women Policy Note 2013

The inability of the UN Commission on the Status of Women (CSW) to agree conclusions at their last meeting in 2012 represented a significant set-back in the long fight for women’s rights. This briefing note sets out what needed to happen to ensure this years session focussing on violence against women was a success.

It suggests developing and adopting a strong set of conclusions that clearly illustrate how states and civil society can make significant progress towards eliminating all forms of violence against women and girls. The Commission are urged to seize the opportunity of the 57th session to accelerate implementation of existing commitments through evidence-based, holistic and integrated approaches spanning the continuum of prevention and multi-sectoral services and responses.

  • Published: March 2013

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