Independent Evaluation of CARE Bangladesh's Cyclone Sidr Response Programme

On 15 November 2007, Cyclone Sidr struck the southwest coast of Bangladesh and high winds and floods caused extensive damage to housing, roads, bridges and other infrastructure.

Electricity supplies and communications were knocked out as roads and waterways were impassable.

Drinking water was contaminated by debris and saline water from the storm surge and sanitation infrastructure was destroyed.

The cyclone caused 3406 deaths and seriously affected about one million households.

Estimated damages and losses were Tk 115.6 billion (US$ 1.7 billion) and mainly concentrated in the housing and productive sectors.

  • Countries: Bangladesh
  • Co-authors: Ian Tod, S. M. Nurul Alam, Nayeem Wahra, Tanzina Hoque, Rukshana Begum
  • Published: August 2008

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