Left behind: How the world is failing women and girls on refugee family reunion

This report, based on new research from Greece and elsewhere, highlights how the failure to provide safe and legal routes for refugees, in particular for family reunion, has gendered impacts on women and girls left stranded in countries of transit.

The report analyses refugee family reunion and reunification from a women's rights perspective, and examines the implications for women and girls of the failure amongst governments to share responsibility in refugee-hosting and to provide safe and legal routes for refugee family reunion. Co-published with the Melissa Network in Greece, it highlights how refugee women activists are playing a key role in assisting, protecting and empowering refugee women and girls, and asks what might governments in Europe, and further afield, do differently to better assist and protect women fleeing violence and persecution.

  • Countries: Greece, Global
  • Co-authors: Melissa Network
  • Published: December 2017

Related Publications

Targeting vulnerable households for humanitarian cash transfers

A case study on using a community-based, participatory approach to target the most vulnerable in Zimbabwe’s cash-first... Read more...


Men and boys in displacement: Assistance and protection challenges for unaccompanied boys and men in refugee contexts

Refugee women and children face specific risks and their needs are, quite rightly, highlighted and addressed by the humanitarian community. However, the situation and specific needs of single male refugees is often less understood. This report... Read more...


Self-recovery from disasters: an interdisciplinary perspective

This paper presents the findings from a pilot research project in the Philippines and Nepal that investigated how disaster-affected households in low- and middle-income countries rebuild their homes in situations where little or no support is... Read more...


CARE International response to ILO Questionnaire on “Ending violence and harassment against women and men in the world of work”

CARE International’s response to the International Labour Organisation Questionnaire sets out why CARE views a possible new Convention as a great opportunity to reduce the prevalence of the gender-based violence which faces the women workers... Read more...


Cash in crisis: The case of Zimbabwe’s ‘Cash First’ humanitarian response

Based on the experience of delivering the first large-scale humanitarian cash programme in Zimbabwe, this briefing paper argues that even during a liquidity crisis, cash transfer programming can still be a feasible option, giving people greater... Read more...