Right to a future: Empowering refugees from Syria and host governments to face a long-term crisis

With no end to the conflict in Syria in sight, the four million people forced to flee the country have no foreseeable prospect of safe return. And as the impact of the crisis on neighbouring countries grows and aid dries up, the situation for these refugees is becoming increasingly dire. This briefing calls for a new approach by the international community, including Syria’s neighbours; one which offers hope, safety and dignity to the millions of refugees, and gives them a chance to contribute to the societies and economies of their hosts.

The report calls on international donors and refugee-hosting governments to work together on five different areas:

  • Ensuring the ‘resilience agenda’ benefits the most vulnerable.
  • Enabling refugees from Syria to reside in neighbouring countries legally without discrimination.
  • Allowing refugees from Syria to access basic services, including adequate and affordable education, medical care and housing, without compromising the quality of public services for host communities.
  • Supporting refugees to be more self-reliant through greater livelihoods opportunities, without negatively affecting the economies of host communities.
  • Ensuring countries neighbouring Syria receive adequate support to change policies and practices to allow refugees and the communities hosting them to cope better. 
  • Countries: Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey
  • Co-authors: Danish Refugee Council, International Rescue Committee, Norwegian Refugee Council, Oxfam, Save the Children, World Vision
  • Published: November 2015

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