Browse by Theme: Aid

CARE, in partnership with the RFSAN/FAO and NRC conducted a livelihoods assessment and an Emergency Market Mapping and Analysis (EMMA) between August and October 2015 in the opposition-held areas of Dar’a and Quneitra governorates.

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Summary report from private sector and civil society roundtable, 21 January 2016

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This joint agency briefing note, signed by CARE and 35 other aid agencies, warns that parts of South Sudan – already the world’s worst food crisis – could fall into famine early in 2015 if the nine-month-long conflict escalates as expected. The report calls for vigorous diplomacy and the delivery of more aid to those who need it.

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Violent conflict and ‘situations of fragility’ represent significant challenges for aid effectiveness. Applying traditional development approaches in an unchanged fashion in such contexts simply does not work.

Aid can have unintended interactions with conflict - both to exacerbate or mitigate violence or the potential for violence.

For this reason, CARE International believes that working in or on conflict requires a different approach.

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Every day, the lives of women and girls are being destroyed by sexual violence. Used as a tactic of war to terrorise communities, with devastating effect, rape is the hidden reality of conflict.

The UN Security Council has committed to tackle this violence before, during and after conflict, and to help the women and girls left to deal with the consequences. We challenge them to make this commitment a reality.

Throughout history, violence against women and girls has been an integral part of armed conflict.

They are killed, injured, widowed and orphaned. Rape has been used by fighting forces as a tactic of war to humiliate, intimidate and traumatise communities, and as a method of ethnic cleansing.

Women and girls are abducted into sexual slavery or forced to exchange sex or marriage for survival.

The statistics are stark. Up to 50,000 women were raped in Bosnia and Herzegovina, and up to 500,000 during the Rwandan genocide.

Horrifyingly, still, 40 women are brutally raped each day in just one province of the Democratic Republic of Congo.

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United Nations Security Council Resolution 1820 (S/RES/1820), unanimously adopted on 19 June 2008, addresses sexual and other forms of gender-based violence (GBV) against women and girls in conflict and post-conflict situations. In the coming weeks, the UN secretariat – led by UN DPKO – will finalise a report outlining recommendations on 1820 implementation, which will then be discussed and adopted by the UN Security Council.

This paper outlines key recommendations from CARE International.
CARE welcomes the international debate on 1820, but we remain concerned that key aspects of GBV prevention and response are neglected by current deliberations.

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This paper seeks to outline a number of issues arising from the politicisation and militarisation of aid resulting from the use of comprehensive approaches, and to highlight the new challenges that this trend poses for civilian populations and non governmental organizations (NGOs).

Through the examination of the Afghanistan case, it aims to explain some of the reasons for NGOs criticism of comprehensive approaches and their reluctance to collaborate with military actors.

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