Browse by Theme: Conflict & Fragility

With the Syria crisis entering its fourth year, the resources of many longer term Syrian refugees in Jordan are being depleted, while other Syrians are just arriving—often with few resources. With increasing needs, the capacities of Jordanian service providers, community-based organizations, and humanitarian actors are stretched. Setting the right programme priorities and identifying the most vulnerable households thus is now more important than ever to ensure different groups—particularly the most vulnerable Syrian men, women, girls, and boys—receive the assistance they need while awaiting return.

The present study aims to enhance all stakeholders’ understanding of the needs, vulnerabilities, and capacities of Syrian refugees and vulnerable hostcommunity members across the four urban areas in Jordan that host the largest number of refugees—Amman, Irbid, Mufraq, and Zarqa. The goal is to contribute to the growing data available by providing community views on needs, vulnerabilities, and capacities, as well as by identifying trends by comparing data with results from the two baseline studies that CARE conducted on the situation of urban refugees in Amman (2012) and in Irbid, Madaba, Mufraq, and Zarqa (2013). 

With the crisis becoming protracted, the effects on vulnerable host communities and on community relations increasingly demand all stakeholders’ attention. As the present study shows, Syrian refugees and vulnerable Jordanian families often share common concerns and needs, and they frequently extend support to each other. Therefore, midterm program options need to be developed that both help maintain community relations and ensure vulnerable Jordanian and Syrian families receive the support they need and do not feel they are competing over resources and access to services.

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How do you effectively monitor and evaluate the unintended conflict consequences of a large development programme, e.g. health services, in a fragile state? This new publication by CARE International UK and CDA gives practical guidance on how to do this. It includes a discussion of the methodological questions that arise when embarking on a process to monitor and evaluate conflict sensitivity, as well as a range of practical and field-tested tools, for use with a variety of different sized interventions e.g. country operational plans, sectors, programmes or projects.

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This briefing note sets out detailed recommendations for the UN High level panel to consider as they begin to consider what might replace the Millennium Development Goals when they expire in 2015. CARE calls for a strong emphasis on gender and social equality, an integrated approach to poverty and climate change, and much much more!

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Boran, Gabra and Garri pastoralists in the border areas of northern Kenya and southern Ethiopia have long relied on the management of natural resources to maximise land use and sustain livestock productivity. Managing herd movements plays a key role in rangeland management, with some areas suitable for use during the dry season and some during the wet season.

The rangeland as a whole constitutes a communally owned economic resource that must be shared among the different pastoralist ethnic groups and clans living in the area. They have developed an institutional system of primary and secondary rights of access with procedures and principles for negotiations between different pastoralist groups to regulate the sharing of water and pasture.

This indigenous institutional framework governs the mobility of herders and their livestock, including across the international border, maintains and restores collaboration among clans and ethnic groups and provides a framework for managing disputes and conflict.

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Violent conflict and ‘situations of fragility’ represent significant challenges for aid effectiveness. Applying traditional development approaches in an unchanged fashion in such contexts simply does not work.

Aid can have unintended interactions with conflict - both to exacerbate or mitigate violence or the potential for violence.

For this reason, CARE International believes that working in or on conflict requires a different approach.

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On going assessment of the factors, issues, and other dynamics is essential to developing objective strategy and making wise choices in conflict situations.

Broad participation in an analysis and assessment process by all the parties will help build a shared perspective on the problem and the steps necessary to move forward.

Indeed, joint analysis is often a key step in bringing parties to the table. The following guide offers a series of questions to help identify useful information.

The commentary is specifically focused on the data from the analysis that will impact the building of a forum and the getting-to-the-table stage of disputes.

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One of the long-standing challenges to successful peacebuilding has been the difficulty of measuring results and generating evidence that can help identify what types of interventions work best. This guide builds on work undertaken by CARE International and International Alert in three countries to pilot theory based evaluation tools to help evaluate the impact of the peacebuilding projects. 19 projects and 38 theories of change were tested, with the resulting tools, tips and processes captured here.

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