Browse by Theme: Conflict Sensitivity

How do you effectively monitor and evaluate the unintended conflict consequences of a large development programme, e.g. health services, in a fragile state? This new publication by CARE International UK and CDA gives practical guidance on how to do this. It includes a discussion of the methodological questions that arise when embarking on a process to monitor and evaluate conflict sensitivity, as well as a range of practical and field-tested tools, for use with a variety of different sized interventions e.g. country operational plans, sectors, programmes or projects.

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This paper lays out the case for a renewed focus on conflict sensitivity by donor agencies. It presents recommendations for how donors can integrate conflict sensitivity into their own systems and processes, as well as how they can promote conflict sensitivity in their implementing partners. The paper is intended to inform and influence policy makers and practitioners across a range of donor agencies. The recommendations have relevance across humanitarian, development and peacebuilding activities. It has been developed by the DFID-funded Conflict Sensitivity Consortium, and draws upon experience and lessons learned during implementation of the consortium project.

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The Conflict Sensitivity Consortium, including CARE International, has placed a heavy emphasis on testing practical approaches to effective conflict sensitivity, learning from experience and carefully documenting identified best practices. This approach has culminated in the production of this How to Guide to Conflict Sensitivity. This Guide draws upon Consortium experience to illustrate real examples of applying conflict sensitivity. It aims to provide practical advice suitable for anyone aiming to improve conflict sensitivity, whether in the field of development, humanitarian aid or peacebuilding work. It aims to provide user-friendly information for people who are focusing at project or at organisation-wide level, whether aiming for best practice or just starting out on the journey towards conflict sensitivity.

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Since the introduction of the Do No Harm framework more than ten years ago, the humanitarian sector has invested in a range of initiatives to address programme quality and accountability. Although aid agencies often seek to be neutral or nonpartisan toward the winners and losers of a war, the impact of their aid is not neutral regarding whether conflict worsens or abates’. This paper identifies conflict flashpoints common to the activities of first-phase emergency responses; identifies how programme and surge capacity staff currently apply conflict sensitivity in the context of rapid-onset emergencies, maps key conflict-sensitivity challenges faced by aid agencies; and draws out conclusions and practical recommendations to strengthen the use of conflict-sensitive approaches in future humanitarian emergencies.

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Rights in Conflict is an encyclopaedia of work documenting the challenges and opportunities of working on rights in conflict contexts. It will be useful for policy makers and practioners alike. Readers can dip into the different chapters to glean knowledge and information on effective practice. The introduction section provides a useful overview on the key concepts in the field of rights and conflict. The last chapter pulls together the different threads of argument. It highlights how rights based approaches can add value in conflict contexts and conversely, how conflict sensitive approaches can add value to rights based approaches. While it outlines the conceptual, operational and organisational challenges of working in these areas, it ends positively, and emphasises steps that can be taken to ensure that work is effective.

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