Browse by Theme: Gender Based Violence

This policy brief calls on states, multilateral agencies and NGOs to commit to ending sexual violence in conflict by scaling up programmes engaging men and boys, funding frontline services for survivors of gender violence during emergencies, and creating clear National Action Plans on gender-based violence prevention and response.

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The report presents a shocking picture of the extent of gender-based violence in the conflict-stricken country of South Sudan, based on a survey of women's experiences of gender-based violence conducted in 2013 and an analysis of the effect of the subsequent months of fighting, violence and displacement.

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An investigation into the UN data on donor aid to emergency appeals for 17 countries in crisis.

In 2013, after years of silence on the issue of gender-based violence, the international community has finally sat up and taken notice of what many NGOs on the ground including CARE have been saying – that sexual violence in and after war and disaster needs to be tackled, both in terms of prevention, and direct assistance to women in the immediate and longer term.

In October 2013, the Secretary of State for International Development was asked how much of their department's funding for the Syria emergency is currently being used for (a) gender-based violence prevention, (b) gender-based violence case management and (c) sexual and reproductive health in (i) Syria and (ii) neighbouring countries.

The Secretary of State answered that it is not possible to detail accurately the overall amount of funding because in most cases they are integrated within wider programmes providing healthcare, livelihoods support and protection.

We decided to investigate the wider question ourselves, not just relating to Syria but also 16 other countries under the Consolidated Appeals Process (CAP).

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The inability of the UN Commission on the Status of Women (CSW) to agree conclusions at their last meeting in 2012 represented a significant set-back in the long fight for women’s rights. This briefing note sets out what needed to happen to ensure this years session focussing on violence against women was a success.

It suggests developing and adopting a strong set of conclusions that clearly illustrate how states and civil society can make significant progress towards eliminating all forms of violence against women and girls. The Commission are urged to seize the opportunity of the 57th session to accelerate implementation of existing commitments through evidence-based, holistic and integrated approaches spanning the continuum of prevention and multi-sectoral services and responses.

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An overview of CARE's approach to tackling gender based violence - what are the root causes? How can NGOs and governments tackle the multiple causes and consequences?. Includes example of CARE's programme work on 'engaging men and boys', and our holistic approach to survivor services including 'one stop shops'.

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Lessons learned from Afghanistan, Nepal and Uganda on women’s participation in peacebuilding and post-conflict governance

UN Security Council Resolution 1325 (SCR 1325, 2000) was hailed a victory for women’s rights activists around the world.

The adoption of the resolution represented a significant step forward in recognising the strategic contribution that women can make to peace and security policy, as well as acknowledging the increasing use of violence against women as a tactic of war.

Yet a decade later, women are still largely absent from peace negotiations. How can the policy be turned into practice, which impacts on the lives of women most affected by conflict?"

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Every day, the lives of women and girls are being destroyed by sexual violence. Used as a tactic of war to terrorise communities, with devastating effect, rape is the hidden reality of conflict.

The UN Security Council has committed to tackle this violence before, during and after conflict, and to help the women and girls left to deal with the consequences. We challenge them to make this commitment a reality.

Throughout history, violence against women and girls has been an integral part of armed conflict.

They are killed, injured, widowed and orphaned. Rape has been used by fighting forces as a tactic of war to humiliate, intimidate and traumatise communities, and as a method of ethnic cleansing.

Women and girls are abducted into sexual slavery or forced to exchange sex or marriage for survival.

The statistics are stark. Up to 50,000 women were raped in Bosnia and Herzegovina, and up to 500,000 during the Rwandan genocide.

Horrifyingly, still, 40 women are brutally raped each day in just one province of the Democratic Republic of Congo.

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