Browse by Theme: Humanitarian

This report argues that strengthening local health systems should be a key focus of humanitarian health responses – bringing together humanitarian actors and local health workers to save lives in the short-term emergency response, and helping to build resilience and improve local health care provision in the longer term.

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This joint agency briefing note, signed by CARE and 35 other aid agencies, warns that parts of South Sudan – already the world’s worst food crisis – could fall into famine early in 2015 if the nine-month-long conflict escalates as expected. The report calls for vigorous diplomacy and the delivery of more aid to those who need it.

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From the Call to Action on Violence Against Women and Girls in Emergencies to the World Humanitarian Summit

This policy briefing paper outlines practical and policy-relevant ways forward for the Call to Action on Violence Against Women and Girls, drawing on CARE’s extensive experience in supporting humanitarian aid and protection for women and girls on the ground in some of the world’s most difficult crises, including Syria, the Democratic Republic of Congo and South Sudan.

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This policy brief calls on states, multilateral agencies and NGOs to commit to ending sexual violence in conflict by scaling up programmes engaging men and boys, funding frontline services for survivors of gender violence during emergencies, and creating clear National Action Plans on gender-based violence prevention and response.

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An investigation into the UN data on donor aid to emergency appeals for 17 countries in crisis.

In 2013, after years of silence on the issue of gender-based violence, the international community has finally sat up and taken notice of what many NGOs on the ground including CARE have been saying – that sexual violence in and after war and disaster needs to be tackled, both in terms of prevention, and direct assistance to women in the immediate and longer term.

In October 2013, the Secretary of State for International Development was asked how much of their department's funding for the Syria emergency is currently being used for (a) gender-based violence prevention, (b) gender-based violence case management and (c) sexual and reproductive health in (i) Syria and (ii) neighbouring countries.

The Secretary of State answered that it is not possible to detail accurately the overall amount of funding because in most cases they are integrated within wider programmes providing healthcare, livelihoods support and protection.

We decided to investigate the wider question ourselves, not just relating to Syria but also 16 other countries under the Consolidated Appeals Process (CAP).

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This paper lays out the case for a renewed focus on conflict sensitivity by donor agencies. It presents recommendations for how donors can integrate conflict sensitivity into their own systems and processes, as well as how they can promote conflict sensitivity in their implementing partners. The paper is intended to inform and influence policy makers and practitioners across a range of donor agencies. The recommendations have relevance across humanitarian, development and peacebuilding activities. It has been developed by the DFID-funded Conflict Sensitivity Consortium, and draws upon experience and lessons learned during implementation of the consortium project.

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Since the introduction of the Do No Harm framework more than ten years ago, the humanitarian sector has invested in a range of initiatives to address programme quality and accountability. Although aid agencies often seek to be neutral or nonpartisan toward the winners and losers of a war, the impact of their aid is not neutral regarding whether conflict worsens or abates’. This paper identifies conflict flashpoints common to the activities of first-phase emergency responses; identifies how programme and surge capacity staff currently apply conflict sensitivity in the context of rapid-onset emergencies, maps key conflict-sensitivity challenges faced by aid agencies; and draws out conclusions and practical recommendations to strengthen the use of conflict-sensitive approaches in future humanitarian emergencies.

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