Browse by Theme: Humanitarian

An investigation into the UN data on donor aid to emergency appeals for 17 countries in crisis.

In 2013, after years of silence on the issue of gender-based violence, the international community has finally sat up and taken notice of what many NGOs on the ground including CARE have been saying – that sexual violence in and after war and disaster needs to be tackled, both in terms of prevention, and direct assistance to women in the immediate and longer term.

In October 2013, the Secretary of State for International Development was asked how much of their department's funding for the Syria emergency is currently being used for (a) gender-based violence prevention, (b) gender-based violence case management and (c) sexual and reproductive health in (i) Syria and (ii) neighbouring countries.

The Secretary of State answered that it is not possible to detail accurately the overall amount of funding because in most cases they are integrated within wider programmes providing healthcare, livelihoods support and protection.

We decided to investigate the wider question ourselves, not just relating to Syria but also 16 other countries under the Consolidated Appeals Process (CAP).

Read more...

This paper lays out the case for a renewed focus on conflict sensitivity by donor agencies. It presents recommendations for how donors can integrate conflict sensitivity into their own systems and processes, as well as how they can promote conflict sensitivity in their implementing partners. The paper is intended to inform and influence policy makers and practitioners across a range of donor agencies. The recommendations have relevance across humanitarian, development and peacebuilding activities. It has been developed by the DFID-funded Conflict Sensitivity Consortium, and draws upon experience and lessons learned during implementation of the consortium project.

Read more...

Since the introduction of the Do No Harm framework more than ten years ago, the humanitarian sector has invested in a range of initiatives to address programme quality and accountability. Although aid agencies often seek to be neutral or nonpartisan toward the winners and losers of a war, the impact of their aid is not neutral regarding whether conflict worsens or abates’. This paper identifies conflict flashpoints common to the activities of first-phase emergency responses; identifies how programme and surge capacity staff currently apply conflict sensitivity in the context of rapid-onset emergencies, maps key conflict-sensitivity challenges faced by aid agencies; and draws out conclusions and practical recommendations to strengthen the use of conflict-sensitive approaches in future humanitarian emergencies.

Read more...

India case study

December 2010

This CARE Market Engagement Innovations and Impacts Case Study features the experience of CARE’s multi-year Tsunami Response Program (TRP) , which was launched in response to the devastating tsunami that hit the east coast of India in 2004. The case study documents TRP’s progression from immediate, humanitarian relief and short-term rehabilitation efforts to long-term economic development interventions focused on rebuilding the livelihoods of marginalized coastal communities. The case focuses explicitely on a value chain approach applied in the smallholder salt sector through which CARE improved smallholder  productivity, processing capacity, and ability to mitigate risks while also enhancing market linkages and improving overall resilience in the chain. This case study provides practitioners and donors with an illustration of the potential for a value chain approach to reduce poverty and and social exclusion in a challenging, post-disaster environment.

Read more...

The devastating earthquake of 12 January 2010 caused 222,570 deaths, left 300,000 injured and 1.3 million displaced people living in settlements according to the Government of Haiti, OCHA and other UN agencies. Large numbers of the affected population continue to live in makeshift shelters, close to their original homes or in self‐settled camps despite the onset of the rainy season.

Read more...

Exploring political marginalisation, donors’ policies and cross-border issues – Literature review.

The Humanitarian Policy Group (HPG) at the Overseas Development Institute (ODI) was commissioned by CARE International (CARE) to provide a review of the literature on the nature of pastoralists’ vulnerability in the Horn of Africa (focusing specifically on Kenya, Somalia and Ethiopia) and chart ways in which agencies have responded and identifying best practice. This literature review is part of a broader project that HPG is undertaking to provide learning support to CARE and document and strengthen best practices around drought cycle management in the Horn of Africa (HoA).

Read more...

Human-induced climate change is modifying patterns of extreme weather, including floods, cyclones and droughts. In many cases, climate change is making these hazards more intense, more frequent, less predictable and/or longer lasting. This magnifies the risk of “disasters” everywhere, but especially in those parts of the world where there are already high levels of human vulnerability.

Read more...
Page 6 of 18