Browse by Theme: Humanitarian

This mapping study is one of a series of five reports commissioned by the NGOs and Humanitarian Reform Project.

It is written by an independent consultant and does not necessarily represent the individual views of the project consortium member.

NGOs and Humanitarian Reform is a three year consortium project funded by DFID.

Member agencies are ActionAid, CAFOD, CARE, International Council of Voluntary Agencies, International Rescue Committee, Oxfam and Save the Children.

This mapping study is one of a series of five reports commissioned by the NGOs and Humanitarian Reform Project.

The consortium was formed to set up and run the project. This project was established to support the effective engagement of international, national and local humanitarian non-governmental agencies (NGOs) in reform efforts.

It promotes an integrated approach across policy-relevant research and operational learning to explore what works and does not work in reform informed by the operational experience of NGOs on the ground.

The project aims to strengthen the NGO voice in policy debates and field processes related humanitarian reform.

Read more...

This mapping study is one of a series of five reports commissioned by the NGOs and Humanitarian Reform Project.

It is written by an independent consultant and does not necessarily represent the individual views of the project consortium member.

NGOs and Humanitarian Reform is a three year consortium project funded by DFID.

Member agencies are ActionAid, CAFOD, CARE, International Council of Voluntary Agencies, International Rescue Committee, Oxfam and Save the Children.

The consortium was formed to set up and run the project. This project was established to support the effective engagement of international, national and local humanitarian non-governmental agencies (NGOs) in reform efforts.

It promotes an integrated approach across policy-relevant research and operational learning to explore what works and does not work in reform informed by the operational experience of NGOs on the ground.

The project aims to strengthen the NGO voice in policy debates and field processes related humanitarian reform.

Read more...

This mapping study is one of a series of five reports commissioned by the NGOs and Humanitarian Reform Project.

It is written by an independent consultant and does not necessarily represent the individual views of the project consortium member.

NGOs and Humanitarian Reform is a three year consortium project funded by DFID.

Member agencies are ActionAid, CAFOD, CARE, International Council of Voluntary Agencies, International Rescue Committee, Oxfam and Save the Children.

The consortium was formed to set up and run the project. This project was established to support the effective engagement of international, national and local humanitarian non-governmental agencies (NGOs) in reform efforts.

It promotes an integrated approach across policy-relevant research and operational learning to explore what works and does not work in reform informed by the operational experience of NGOs on the ground.

The project aims to strengthen the NGO voice in policy debates and field processes related humanitarian reform.

Read more...

The following presentation was given by Tasneem Mowjee, Senior Policy Advisor, Development Initiatives, who is the lead independent researcher for 5 Mapping Studies commissioned by the NGOs and Humanitarian Reform Project at the start of the project to research the humanitarian reforms in the project focus countries. It reflects the independent researchers’ findings particularly in relation to reformed financing mechanisms.

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This mapping study is one of a series of five reports commissioned by the NGOs and Humanitarian Reform Project.

It is written by an independent consultant and does not necessarily represent the individual views of the project consortium member.

NGOs and Humanitarian Reform is a three year consortium project funded by DFID.

Member agencies are ActionAid, CAFOD, CARE, International Council of Voluntary Agencies, International Rescue Committee, Oxfam and Save the Children.

The consortium was formed to set up and run the project. This project was established to support the effective engagement of international, national and local humanitarian non-governmental agencies (NGOs) in reform efforts.

It promotes an integrated approach across policy-relevant research and operational learning to explore what works and does not work in reform informed by the operational experience of NGOs on the ground.

The project aims to strengthen the NGO voice in policy debates and field processes related humanitarian reform.

Read more...

Millions are living on the edge of emergency. The number of people living on the edge of emergency has rocketed to 220 million. The world's poorest are paying a high price for the international aid system's failure to address factors keeping them in chronic poverty. With food price rises adding to the problem many people just don’t have enough to eat. Most of them live on the edge because we keep them there. Money raised to respond to emergencies often leaves them worse off than they were before. CARE is demanding that we put a stop to this by calling for a dramatic overhaul of the system which is keeping them trapped.

Our report calls on the international community to give higher priority to recovery and prevention programmes like seed distribution and improved veterinary services so that families can pull themselves back from the edge and be in a stronger position to fight off the next emergency themselves.

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On 15 November 2007, Cyclone Sidr struck the southwest coast of Bangladesh and high winds and floods caused extensive damage to housing, roads, bridges and other infrastructure.

Electricity supplies and communications were knocked out as roads and waterways were impassable.

Drinking water was contaminated by debris and saline water from the storm surge and sanitation infrastructure was destroyed.

The cyclone caused 3406 deaths and seriously affected about one million households.

Estimated damages and losses were Tk 115.6 billion (US$ 1.7 billion) and mainly concentrated in the housing and productive sectors.

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