Browse by Theme: Humanitarian

India case study

December 2010

This CARE Market Engagement Innovations and Impacts Case Study features the experience of CARE’s multi-year Tsunami Response Program (TRP) , which was launched in response to the devastating tsunami that hit the east coast of India in 2004. The case study documents TRP’s progression from immediate, humanitarian relief and short-term rehabilitation efforts to long-term economic development interventions focused on rebuilding the livelihoods of marginalized coastal communities. The case focuses explicitely on a value chain approach applied in the smallholder salt sector through which CARE improved smallholder  productivity, processing capacity, and ability to mitigate risks while also enhancing market linkages and improving overall resilience in the chain. This case study provides practitioners and donors with an illustration of the potential for a value chain approach to reduce poverty and and social exclusion in a challenging, post-disaster environment.

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The devastating earthquake of 12 January 2010 caused 222,570 deaths, left 300,000 injured and 1.3 million displaced people living in settlements according to the Government of Haiti, OCHA and other UN agencies. Large numbers of the affected population continue to live in makeshift shelters, close to their original homes or in self‐settled camps despite the onset of the rainy season.

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Exploring political marginalisation, donors’ policies and cross-border issues – Literature review.

The Humanitarian Policy Group (HPG) at the Overseas Development Institute (ODI) was commissioned by CARE International (CARE) to provide a review of the literature on the nature of pastoralists’ vulnerability in the Horn of Africa (focusing specifically on Kenya, Somalia and Ethiopia) and chart ways in which agencies have responded and identifying best practice. This literature review is part of a broader project that HPG is undertaking to provide learning support to CARE and document and strengthen best practices around drought cycle management in the Horn of Africa (HoA).

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Human-induced climate change is modifying patterns of extreme weather, including floods, cyclones and droughts. In many cases, climate change is making these hazards more intense, more frequent, less predictable and/or longer lasting. This magnifies the risk of “disasters” everywhere, but especially in those parts of the world where there are already high levels of human vulnerability.

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This mapping study is one of a series of five reports commissioned by the NGOs and Humanitarian Reform Project.

It is written by an independent consultant and does not necessarily represent the individual views of the project consortium member.

NGOs and Humanitarian Reform is a three year consortium project funded by DFID.

Member agencies are ActionAid, CAFOD, CARE, International Council of Voluntary Agencies, International Rescue Committee, Oxfam and Save the Children.

This mapping study is one of a series of five reports commissioned by the NGOs and Humanitarian Reform Project.

The consortium was formed to set up and run the project. This project was established to support the effective engagement of international, national and local humanitarian non-governmental agencies (NGOs) in reform efforts.

It promotes an integrated approach across policy-relevant research and operational learning to explore what works and does not work in reform informed by the operational experience of NGOs on the ground.

The project aims to strengthen the NGO voice in policy debates and field processes related humanitarian reform.

Read more...

This mapping study is one of a series of five reports commissioned by the NGOs and Humanitarian Reform Project.

It is written by an independent consultant and does not necessarily represent the individual views of the project consortium member.

NGOs and Humanitarian Reform is a three year consortium project funded by DFID.

Member agencies are ActionAid, CAFOD, CARE, International Council of Voluntary Agencies, International Rescue Committee, Oxfam and Save the Children.

The consortium was formed to set up and run the project. This project was established to support the effective engagement of international, national and local humanitarian non-governmental agencies (NGOs) in reform efforts.

It promotes an integrated approach across policy-relevant research and operational learning to explore what works and does not work in reform informed by the operational experience of NGOs on the ground.

The project aims to strengthen the NGO voice in policy debates and field processes related humanitarian reform.

Read more...

This mapping study is one of a series of five reports commissioned by the NGOs and Humanitarian Reform Project.

It is written by an independent consultant and does not necessarily represent the individual views of the project consortium member.

NGOs and Humanitarian Reform is a three year consortium project funded by DFID.

Member agencies are ActionAid, CAFOD, CARE, International Council of Voluntary Agencies, International Rescue Committee, Oxfam and Save the Children.

The consortium was formed to set up and run the project. This project was established to support the effective engagement of international, national and local humanitarian non-governmental agencies (NGOs) in reform efforts.

It promotes an integrated approach across policy-relevant research and operational learning to explore what works and does not work in reform informed by the operational experience of NGOs on the ground.

The project aims to strengthen the NGO voice in policy debates and field processes related humanitarian reform.

Read more...
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