Browse by Theme: Inclusive Governance

Pastoral areas in the Horn of Africa are frequently seen as a region of poverty and constant crisis, where repeated rain failures leave millions of people dependent on food aid. The long-term erosion of pastoralists’ resilience is ascribed to various causes: a degraded range, the loss of key grazing lands, increasing population pressure and conflict. But pastoralism is also a modern industry, bringing in hundreds of millions of dollars each year from a thriving international trade, creating an increasingly commercialised livestock-owning class coexist-ing with an ever poorer majority.

This presents a dual challenge. How can this vital economic sector be supported, at the same time as sup-porting the majority of pastoralists to remain independent, with resilient livelihoods?

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Conditional Cash Transfer (CCTs) programmes support extremely poor households with a cash subsidy, on condition that children attend school and health checks. Evaluations have shown CCTs have succeeded in improving children’s school attendance, and nutritional and health indicators. But there is comparatively less evidence on whether CCTs address women’s needs and rights. 

This article provides a summary of the findings of CARE International’s recent research on CCTs impact on gender equity in Peru, Ecuador and Bolivia.
The research showed a number of practical gains for women participants. However, it also found the CCT programmes did not challenge women’s traditional maternal roles, did not directly increase women’s knowledge of their rights or tackle issues such as violence against women.  CCTs need to be more explicitly geared toward women’s social and economic empowerment if they are to be truly effective at lifting women out of poverty.

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The adoption of Cash Transfer programmes in much of the Latin American region is credited with helping to bring poverty reduction about. These programmes are widely promoted as a cost effective and efficient means by which to target vulnerable groups. The model pioneered in Latin America is designed to assist poor households with the cost of schooling, and an innovative feature is that the transfer is given directly to the mothers. It is claimed that this maximises efficiency and achieves positive results because women’s spending in low income households, in contrast to men’s, is largely directed at satisfying children’s and household’s needs. It is also claimed that women benefit from their control over this resource and that their participation in the programme is empowering women. This article provides a summary of some key findings of recent research in Latin America, supported by CARE International UK.

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This paper explores and shares some of CARE’s experience of governance work, demonstrating outcomes that were achieved, the strategies used to achieve them, and some of the key challenges faced. The experiences and reflections shared here are products of the Governance Action Research (GARI) in which six country offices participated: Angola, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Nepal and Peru. The initiative worked with staff and partners through action research to encourage particpants to reflect on how governance works in their context and to unpack the ways in which CARE’s governance programming impacts upon the lives of the people in that context.

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Conditional cash transfer programmes provide extremely poor households with a cash subsidy, on condition that children attend school, and mothers and infants undergo health checks.

These programmes are generally considered effective social protection mechanisms, and success in meeting children’s nutrition, education, and health targets is reported. However, the impact of these programmes on women’s empowerment and intra-household dynamics is under-explored.
This article provides a summary of some key findings of recent research in Latin America, supported by CARE International UK.

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The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the transformative potential of inclusive local governance in generating more secure livelihood and coping strategies of extremely poor people. The research conducted in 2008 and 2009 looking at Care Bangladesh’s work at the Union Parishad level found that active citizenship of the poorest, often women, led to more equitable distribution of public resources. Care Bangladesh’s experience also highlights some interesting implication for policy both in the areas of social protection and governance.

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Livestock is the main household asset and a key productive resource for pastoralist communitiesliving in the border areas of Kenya and Ethiopia. However, recurrent droughts are eroding pastoralists’ livestock base and weakening their livelihoods and their resilience to climatic shocks.

Livestock marketing, understood as the process through which live animals change ownership, is increasingly perceived as critical for improving pastoral household income. Efforts aimed at addressing constraints to the development of efficient and vibrant livestock marketing activities in the region are increasingly seen as a meaningful way of reducing pastoralists’ vulnerability to drought.

This baseline study, commissioned by CARE International, identifies structural issues behind livestock marketing in Mandera Central and West in Kenya and the Borana zone in Ethiopia. The study also aims to provide potential entry points for action to improve livestock marketing in the region.

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