Browse by Theme: Inclusive Governance

This synthesis report gives detailed information and findings from research into the experience of CARE International in implementing Community Score Card programmes in four countries – Ethiopia, Malawi, Tanzania and Rwanda. The report aims to address the significant research gap around cross-country comparative analysis of social accountability programmes.

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This paper summarises CARE’s position on strengths and weaknesses of the UN Secretary-General’s Synthesis Report of post-2015 sustainable development consultations to date, in relation to gender, climate change, governance and accountability.

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This paper, produced by CARE International with the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS) and the Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation (CTA), outlines the complex and inter-related challenges and barriers to achieving global food and nutrition security in an increasingly variable climate.

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In spite of global progress in reducing absolute poverty, wide gaps persist between and within countries. This program strategy sets out a vision for how CARE will fight inequality in order to overcome the injustice of poverty.

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Findings and lessons learned from the Great Lakes Advocacy Initiative

This short policy brief summarises the main lessons learned from a project implemented by CARE and its partners in Burundi, Rwanda, Uganda and the DRC from 2009 to 2013, which aimed to contribute to the increased protection of women and girls against gender-based violence in the region.

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CARE Malawi developed the Community Score Card (CSC) in 2002 as part of a project aimed at developing innovative and sustainable models to improve health services. Since then, the CSC has become an internationally recognised participatory governance approach for improving the implementation of quality services. This toolkit gives practical, step-by-step guidance on using the CSC approach. The toolkit is generic in nature and can be applied in any sector including health, education, water and sanitation, and agriculture.

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Boran, Gabra and Garri pastoralists in the border areas of northern Kenya and southern Ethiopia have long relied on the management of natural resources to maximise land use and sustain livestock productivity. Managing herd movements plays a key role in rangeland management, with some areas suitable for use during the dry season and some during the wet season.

The rangeland as a whole constitutes a communally owned economic resource that must be shared among the different pastoralist ethnic groups and clans living in the area. They have developed an institutional system of primary and secondary rights of access with procedures and principles for negotiations between different pastoralist groups to regulate the sharing of water and pasture.

This indigenous institutional framework governs the mobility of herders and their livestock, including across the international border, maintains and restores collaboration among clans and ethnic groups and provides a framework for managing disputes and conflict.

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