Browse by Theme: Livelihoods

Anabig Ayaab is a 50 year old farmer from Tariganga, Garu-Tempane District, in the Upper East Region of Ghana. Tariganga is in the dry savannah zone of northern Ghana where vegetative cover is sparse, especially during the dry season. The village and surrounding landscape is flat and dusty at this time, with the few trees that still stand, including shea-nut used for cosmetics and dawadawa, a local medicinal tree, shedding their leaves. The landscape will become increasingly green with the June rains. These rains will only last until October when the dry season, with varying temperatures and wind conditions, will set in again and last for the remainder of the year, guaranteeing a hungry period from March or April until the next rains.

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Borders, in the pastoral context of the drylands of the Horn of Africa with high levels of human and animal mobility, have little relevance and meaning to the populations living in border areas in Kenya, Uganda, Ethiopia, Somalia and Somaliland. As international borders do not follow ethnic or eco-system lines, pastoral populations move freely across them. As a result, in the Horn of Africa’s border areas, it is essential to take these cross border movements and dynamics into consideration when implementing drought risk reduction programs as what happens on one side of the border affects the other.

Although cross border programming maybe across intra-country borders; ecosystem borders or ethnic borders, the discussion here is focused on international borders.

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The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the transformative potential of inclusive local governance in generating more secure livelihood and coping strategies of extremely poor people. The research conducted in 2008 and 2009 looking at Care Bangladesh’s work at the Union Parishad level found that active citizenship of the poorest, often women, led to more equitable distribution of public resources. Care Bangladesh’s experience also highlights some interesting implication for policy both in the areas of social protection and governance.

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Climate change poses the greatest direct threat in history to CARE’s vision of a world of hope, tolerance and social justice where poverty has been overcome and people live in dignity and security.

The injustice of climate change is that its negative impacts fall disproportionately on poor communities, who have contributed least to its causes.

CARE’s Adaptation Learning Programme (ALP), implemented in Ghana, Niger, Kenya and Mozambique with the support of DFID, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Finland and the Austrian Development Cooperation, acknowledges that inequitable distributions of rights, resources and power at all levels constrain many people’s abilities to take action on climate change.

ALP therefore seeks to improve and promote knowledge on how best to protect the livelihoods of the most vulnerable people through community-based adaptation (CBA) to climate change.

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Livestock is the main household asset and a key productive resource for pastoralist communitiesliving in the border areas of Kenya and Ethiopia. However, recurrent droughts are eroding pastoralists’ livestock base and weakening their livelihoods and their resilience to climatic shocks.

Livestock marketing, understood as the process through which live animals change ownership, is increasingly perceived as critical for improving pastoral household income. Efforts aimed at addressing constraints to the development of efficient and vibrant livestock marketing activities in the region are increasingly seen as a meaningful way of reducing pastoralists’ vulnerability to drought.

This baseline study, commissioned by CARE International, identifies structural issues behind livestock marketing in Mandera Central and West in Kenya and the Borana zone in Ethiopia. The study also aims to provide potential entry points for action to improve livestock marketing in the region.

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Livestock is the main household asset and a key productive resource for pastoralist communities living in the border areas of Kenya and Ethiopia. However, recurrent droughts are eroding pastoralists' livestock base and weakening their livelihoods and their resilience to climatic shocks.

Livestock marketing, understood as the process through which live animals change ownership, is increasingly perceived as critical for improving pastoral household income. Efforts aimed at addressing constraints to the development of efficient and vibrant livestock marketing activities in the region are increasingly seen as a meaningful way of reducing pastoralists' vulnerability to drought.

This baseline study, commissioned by CARE International, identifies structural issues behind livestock marketing in Mandera Central and West in Kenya and the Borana zone in Ethiopia. The study also aims to provide potential entry points for action to improve livestock marketing in the region

Read more...

In 2009, CARE invested USD 100,000 in Mobile Transactions Zambia, Ltd to create an e-voucher system to improve asset transfer programs targeting rural smallholders. The system has dramatically reduced costs, increased efficiency and transparency and is fostering the expansion of a network of over 500 enterprises dedicated to providing Zambian farmers with affordable access to quality inputs.

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