Browse by Theme: Health

This report provides a comprehensive overview of the EMPHASIS (Enhancing Mobile Populations’ Access to HIV/AIDS Services Information and Support) project, a 5-year project implemented in India, Nepal and Bangladesh addressing cross border mobility-related vulnerabilities, using an HIV lens and with a specific gender focus.

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This briefing presents the key messages and experiences from the 5-year EMPHASIS (Enhancing Mobile Populations’ Access to HIV and AIDS Services, Information and Support) project in Bangladesh, Nepal and India.

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This report on the EMPHASIS (Enhancing Mobile Populations’ Access to HIV and AIDS Services, Information and Support) project suggests that reaching cross-border migrants with information in their home countries and at their destinations can lead to safer mobility and positive health outcomes.

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This briefing presents findings from the the 5-year EMPHASIS project on migrants and HIV in Nepal, Bangladesh and India. Analysis of the project suggests that HIV and AIDS prevention programmes that focus on peer education for migrants within both their source and destination countries are vital to increase their knowledge on the risks of infection, reduce behaviour that increases these risks and expand their HIV-related service uptake.

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Migration is a critical, yet underexplored, dimension of the post-2015 development agenda. On 17-18 July, CARE and ODI are hosting the Women, migration and development conference. We want to know what you think on some of the key issues the conference will be debating.

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Earlier this year, I spent a few months in a village in Accham district in far-west Nepal in an effort to understand what motivates people to leave their homes and migrate to the towns and cities of India, writes Tahseen Alam from the EMPHASIS project. Documenting the lives and experiences of migrants as they made their way from Nepal to India was an eye-opening journey for me as well.

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The upcoming global summit (from June 10–13 in London) shines the spotlight back onto the subject of sexual violence in conflict. Newcomers to the subject might gasp and rightly point out: “This is horrifying, this is awful, something must be done!” – and so it must. But some humanitarian practitioners, speaking quietly from the back of the room, might say: “Excuse me, we have been working on this all along”.

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