Cash in crisis: The case of Zimbabwe’s ‘Cash First’ humanitarian response

Based on the experience of delivering the first large-scale humanitarian cash programme in Zimbabwe, this briefing paper argues that even during a liquidity crisis, cash transfer programming can still be a feasible option, giving people greater freedom and dignity of choice during times of crisis.

The paper concludes that cash transfers are a cost-effective and cost-efficient modality for meeting community needs, and makes policy recommendations for future cash transfer programming.

  • Countries: Zimbabwe, Global
  • Published: July 2017

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