Citizen monitoring to defend maternal health rights in Peru

This paper (Learning and Policy Series No. 6) presents learning from CARE’s experience of citizen monitoring of health services in the Peruvian highlands. The model developed by CARE allows citizens to voice their concerns, hold service providers to account, and promote dialogue between them to constructively improve the quality of services.

Experience in Peru shows that citizen monitoring can have an important impact on the quality of service delivery. Beyond empowering monitors themselves, the citizen monitoring model has improved transparency in health facilities, ensured greater respect for users’ preferences in birth delivery, and helped reduce corruption; and this improved quality has generated greater demand for health services.

  • Countries: Peru
  • Published: September 2015

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