Targeting vulnerable households for humanitarian cash transfers

A case study on using a community-based, participatory approach to target the most vulnerable in Zimbabwe’s cash-first response.

The key challenge in targeting is how to establish who is most vulnerable. This case study evaluates the cash transfer programme’s overall targeting process, from the macro, provincial level, to the micro, household level. It explains the targeting process, highlights successes and challenges faced and incorporates recommendations for future cash transfer programmes.

  • Countries: Zimbabwe, Global
  • Co-authors: World Vision
  • Published: December 2017

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