Browse by Theme: Health

Migration is a critical, yet underexplored, dimension of the post-2015 development agenda. On 17-18 July, CARE and ODI are hosting the Women, migration and development conference. We want to know what you think on some of the key issues the conference will be debating.

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Earlier this year, I spent a few months in a village in Accham district in far-west Nepal in an effort to understand what motivates people to leave their homes and migrate to the towns and cities of India, writes Tahseen Alam from the EMPHASIS project. Documenting the lives and experiences of migrants as they made their way from Nepal to India was an eye-opening journey for me as well.

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The upcoming global summit (from June 10–13 in London) shines the spotlight back onto the subject of sexual violence in conflict. Newcomers to the subject might gasp and rightly point out: “This is horrifying, this is awful, something must be done!” – and so it must. But some humanitarian practitioners, speaking quietly from the back of the room, might say: “Excuse me, we have been working on this all along”.

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In February 2012 CARE Pakistan started a project titled: 'Advocating for improved maternal newborn health (MNH) and sexual reproductive health (SRH) policy and practice for adolescent girls and young mothers (AIMS).' Implemented in partnership with Rahnuma-Family Planning Association of Pakistan (FPAP), this 14 month initiative combined evidence based research with targeted advocacy to successfully bring about changes in Pakistan's policies regarding MHN and SRH for adolescent girls and young mothers.

The AIMS project aimed to increase awareness regarding the specific reproductive and sexual health needs of adolescent girls and young mothers, and to advocate for their inclusion in provincial health policies. CARE and FPAP used evidence from the project's research to design a targeted advocacy strategy and to engage with key stakeholders including provincial parliamentarians, district officials, community leaders, civil society and media representatives, through a structured process of meetings, workshops and consultations. This is one of the outcomes of the project's research component.

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Along with a delegation from CARE International UK, I recently visited colleagues at CARE Peru (or Cah-Rey Peru as its pronounced in Spanish!) to witness how they are reaping real results in tackling the challenges of poverty and inequality in a ‘Middle Income Country’ (MIC).

A MIC is defined by the World Bank as any country with a Gross National Income per capita above $1000. The EU, UK and other donors are busy cutting aid to these countries,  arguing that in times of austerity development aid should be only be spent in Low Income Countries.

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As Usain Bolt pounded to the 200m finish line, displaying formidable human strength, my mind wandered to the Olympics and Paralympics aftermath. The Olympics this year closed to a new opening – one that is hoped to herald in new commitments to reducing malnutrition rates across the developing world.

Looking at Bolt’s muscles flexing across the screen, it seemed apt that the UK’s Hunger Summit on Sunday, which hopes to capitalise on the energy of the Olympics, was promoted by some of the UK’s leading athletes. Sportsmen such as David Beckham and Mo Farah must understand more than most the importance of nutrition.

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It’s good to be back in Sierra Leone again. I was last here in 2009. It is a country full of life, with a constant buzz about it. But it’s a country that has faced more than its fair share of problems and is again faced with another problem; cholera.

Over 250 people have died with over 15,000 reported cases. The Government of Sierra Leone has declared a national emergency. CARE, with funding from the British Government’s new Rapid Response Facility, is quickly scaling up its cholera response programme. This is not an easy job when getting to many areas is a logistical challenge at the best of times let alone when hampered by the rainy season. Even in the capital city, Freetown, roads are a disconcerting experience. With potholes everywhere, cars are constantly moving from both sides of the road to avoid them.

 

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