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Family Planning Summit

Family Planning Summit

What is the Family Planning Summit?

The one-day high level Summit, held in London on 11 July 2017, aimed to build on the progress made in many countries since the London Summit on Family Planning in 2012. Governments, donors, the private sector and civil society gathered together to make more ambitious and substantial commitments to achieve the goals of FP2020 – a global partnership that supports the rights of women and girls to decide, freely, and for themselves, whether, when, and how many children they want to have.

Read our verdict on the Summit

Why was it important?

Voluntary family planning helps women take control over decisions about when and how many children to have. It saves lives and has the power to boost the development of entire countries. Read more in the Family Planning Summit concept note. The Summit focused on:

  • innovative financial solutions to ensure quality contraceptive options are available around the world
  • strengthening supply chains so that women have access to and can choose a method that best meets their needs
  • empowering young people to have access to contraceptives and to be able to make their own choices
  • reaching the hardest to reach, especially women experiencing humanitarian crises or facing other socio-cultural barriers

Read CARE’s key messages and policy asks (download 2-page PDF)

CARE advocated in particular for:

Read more

Family planning saves lives and promotes resilience in humanitarian contexts – this report published by the International Rescue Committee, CARE, Save the Children and the Women’s Refugee Commission On behalf of the the Inter-agency Working Group for Reproductive Health in Crises (IAWG) includes collaborative solutions and actions that need to be taken by countries, implementing agencies, and donors

Family planning in emergencies – why is it so crucial, and how can it be truly life-saving?

Let’s accelerate progress and fill key gaps – what CARE has done so far, and what we are going to do to achieve even more

CARE’s approach to Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights – an overview of our programme approach to SRHR

Designing for impact at scale – CARE’s 2016 report on progress towards our objective of supporting 100 million women and girls to exercise their rights to sexual, reproductive and maternal health and a life free from violence by 2020

Supporting access to family planning and post-abortion care in emergencies – a summary of CARE’s SAFPAC project in Chad, DRC and Pakistan

CARE’s family planning wiki – our online Sexual and Reproductive Health & Rights knowledge centre

Video

CARE not only expands access to sexual and reproductive health services, but we fight for the laws that protect them — and the women they save. Case in point: Dr Jimmy in Chad.

Publications See all

The Path to 2020: Delivering transformative, rights-based family planning
In 2012, CARE joined other civil society organisations, governments and donors to commit to providing an additional 120 million women and girls with family planning information and services by 2020.…
2017 Family Planning Summit: CARE's Key Messages and Policy Asks
FP2020 has brought a powerful focus on family planning – but we must accelerate progress and fill key gaps to ensure we reach all people with the contraception/family planning services…
Ensuring universal access to family planning in crisis-affected settings: Key messages and policy asks
Of the 225 million women with unmet need for family planning, many live in areas affected by conflict or natural disasters. Delivering family planning services in these settings is critical…
Improving maternal and child health in Asia through innovative partnerships and approaches
This research brief provides an overview of the impact of project interventions and CARE’s best practices under the GSK ‘20% Reinvestment Initiative’ in Asia. This strategic partnership between CARE and…

You might also be interested in...

Family planning services are desperately needed in conflicts and disasters – Huffington Post blog by Hana Pauls, a midwife on the Channel 4 TV series One Born Every Minute, reflecting on her conversation with Mary Poni Daniel, a midwife in South Sudan

Family planning: It’s everyone’s business – Business Fights Poverty blog by Alice Allan (CARE International UK) about the role of the private sector and harnessing the power of supply chains to ensure no one is left behind without access to family planning

Contraception is a human right, not a tool for population controlNew Statesman blog by Christine Galavotti (CARE USA) and Casey Williams arguing that protecting reproductive rights is about helping women assume the control they are entitled to

In the world’s worst crises, access to sexual and reproductive health and rights is paramount – blog by Gillian Barth (CARE Canada) and Sandeep Prasad on OpenCanada.org

Adding It Up: Investing in contraception and maternal and newborn health – a study by the Guttmacher Institute (published 29 June 2017) which finds that 214 million women in developing countries want to avoid pregnancy but are not using a modern method of contraception

On World Refugee Day, let’s talk about family planning – FP2020 Director Beth Schlachter on the need for access to comprehensive reproductive health services for all women and girls affected by crisis

Plans for major family planning summit take shape – a devex blog by Sophie Edwards about the Summit’s aims and the potential impact of the US government’s reinstatement of the “global gag rule”

Contraceptives a game changer for crisis-affected women in northern Nigeria – article on UNFPA website

To reach 2020 goals, the London Summit on Family Planning cannot afford to leave refugees behind – blog by Rita Nehme of the International Rescue Committee

 

Resources and links

Family Planning 2020 website

Momentum at the Midpoint 2015-16 reviewing progress towards the FP2020 goal of enabling 120 million additional women and girls to use contraceptives by 2020

Family Planning Summit website

Sustainable Development Goal 3 which aims to ensure universal access to sexual and reproductive health-care services by 2030

IAWG – Inter-Agency Working Group on Reproductive Health in Crises website

Minimum Initial Service Package (MISP) on reproductive health in emergencies – read more on the UNFPA website and on the IAWG website