Browse by Theme: Covid19

“Youth are rarely informed about their rights. During COVID, we’ve imposed ourselves so even the most disadvantaged young people have access to information about COVID. We hold sessions for young beggars and street children so they have information. I’ve been a part of that, and it makes me very happy.” – Bizo Rachid is 25, and getting a degree in Law and Communication in Niger.

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Three months after CARE’s first Rapid Gender Analysis on COVID-19, what has changed, what is the same, and what do we know now? CARE has continued to closely monitor this situation by conducting context-specific analyses in 5 regions covering 64 countries. This has included conversations and data collection with more than 4,500 women. This new analysis confirms the initial findings and predictions of the first analysis, and reveals new areas of high priority for women and girls — and for men and boys — as the crisis deepens.

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As part of London Climate Action Week 2020, CARE hosted 'Gender-just climate resilience in the COVID-19 response'.

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A summary of the key findings of a forthcoming CARE Rapid Gender Analysis for Middle East and North Africa (MENA) examining the impacts for refugees and displaced people of the coronavirus pandemic and the economically damaging efforts at controlling and mitigating COVID-19.

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Governments, NGOs, and society at large must work towards the end of child marriage, but it is also critical to recognise the power of girls to lead the way to end this practice in their own communities. UNFPA estimates that 13 million more child marriages could take place by 2030 than would have prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. At the same time, programmes that work to end child marriage are unable to operate due to shelter-in-place directives. However, girl activists, within their own communities, are able to subversively challenge the norms and attitudes that put them at risk for child marriage.

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The COVID-19 crisis is disproportionately affecting women and girls. This makes it all the more important that their voices are equally included in the decision-making spaces and processes where responses are formed. CARE’s research has found that where women do have higher levels of leadership, governments are more likely to be responding to the crisis in a way that supports gender equality. Women’s participation is necessary at every level and in every arena, from national crisis committees to the local communities on the frontlines of humanitarian responses.

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The COVID-19 pandemic poses a huge threat to billions of people around the world, but it can’t be the only priority for aid. Other humanitarian disasters and emergencies have not gone away. Countries that still don’t meet the UN target of sharing 7p in every £10 with people in poorer countries, should try as hard as possible to increase their aid budget to respond to the new COVID-19 pandemic, and try to avoid taking aid away from other emergencies.  

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