Browse by Theme: Resilience

This paper was written by Eva Ludi and Simon Levine based on three site reports (see references) which were produced by a team of researchers from Haramaya University comprising Million Getnet, Kindie Tesfaye, Beneberu Shimelis, Hiluf Gebrekidan, and Belay Kassa and from contributions by Million Getnet and Kirsty Wilson provided during a working session in Addis Ababa in July 2011.

The authors would like to acknowledge the contribution of the communities in Ander Kello, Kase-hija and Wokin  kebeles as well as staff from Chifra, Gemechis and Dabat wereda bureaus and Care, Oxfam, ORDA and Save the Children UK.

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The Local Adaptive Capacity framework (LAC) was developed by the Africa Climate Change Resilience Alliance (ACCRA). The paper draws on extensive consultations with academics, policy-makers and practitioners and is an attempt to incorporate the intangible and dynamic dimensions of adaptive capacity, as well as capital and resource-based components, into an analysis of adaptive capacity at local level.

The framework forms a conceptual basis for ACCRA’s country level research, which seeks to understand how development or social protection interventions undertaken by ACCRA members (Oxfam, Save the Children, World Vision and CARE) contribute to adaptive capacity in 11 communities in three African countries (Uganda, Mozambique and Ethiopia).

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This case study analyzes the results, lessons learned and recommendations emerging from the application of the Climate Vulnerability and Capacity Assessment (CVCA) methodology in the context of the PRAA project. First, it presents an overview of the project, the areas of intervention by country, the results of the analysis itself, and lastly, the main lessons learned and recommendations that arose from the application of the tools contained in the CVCA Handbook in Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia.

The CVCA methodology is a tool developed by CARE to delineate the socio-‐economic aspects of vulnerability to climate change, particularly those factors that make women and other marginalized groups especially vulnerable. The results of the analysis provide a solid foundation for identifying practical strategies to enable community-‐based adaptation to climate change.

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"Adapting to climate change is about reducing vulnerability to current and projected climate risks. Vulnerability to climate change is determined in large part by people’s adaptive capacity. A particular climate hazard, such as a drought, does not affect all people within a community - or even the same household - equally because some people have greater capacity than others to manage the crisis. The inequitable distribution of rights, resources and power – as well as repressive cultural rules and norms – constrain many people’s ability to take action on climate change.

This is especially true for women. Therefore, gender is a critical factor in understanding vulnerability to climate change. CARE’s approach to adaptation begins with comprehensive analysis, including an examination of differential vulnerability due to social, political and economic inequalities."

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"To reduce people’s vulnerability to climate change, CARE focuses on building adaptive capacity and, in some cases, reducing exposure or sensitivity to its impacts. We are also taking steps to ensure our development programs and projects contribute, whenever possible, to strengthening resilience and that they don’t inadvertently worsen vulnerabilities. These processes are often called “adaptation to climate change.
Adaptation is defined by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) as: Adjustment in natural or human systems in response to actual or expected climatic stimuli or their effects, which moderates harm or exploits beneficial opportunities."

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Mozambique faces both rapidly changing climate and development pressures. At the local level, many communities do not have the necessary tools, resources or capacity to adapt, and will require support from government and other development actors.

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"CARE is working to help people and communities in developing countries better adapt and become more resilient to a climate they did not create. We support women and men, girls and boys becoming agents of change–because we believe that, with the right knowledge and sufficient means, families are able to adapt themselves.

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