Browse by Theme: Sexual Reproductive & Maternal Health

Today, at the 5th Global Symposium on Health Systems Research in Liverpool, UK, I’m presenting key learning from CARE’s highly successful and Global Good Award winning Private Community Skilled Birth Attendant (P-CSBA) programme in Bangladesh, part of CARE and GSK’s global partnership to train and support frontline health workers. Here are the top-line findings – and what they tell us about the potential of public-private partnerships.

Read more...

Masuda, Shankori and Shilpi are entrepreneurial midwives who are improving health access in one of the most remote districts in Bangladesh, where maternal and under-5 mortality rates have fallen dramatically in recent years. These powerful women are also generating more income for their families and changing social norms. Having met them on a trip to Bangladesh, Kate Barwise considers what can be learned from their successes and how to support more women like them to help more communities.

Read more...

When Theresa May welcomes Trump this week it seems like she won’t be short of conversation: there’s the World Cup, Brexit, and NATO before we even start. But with hundreds of thousands of people from all over the UK coming to join the Women’s March this Friday, a clear message is that women’s rights should be on the agenda.

Read more...

This report presents learning from the Vijana Juu project in the Democratic Republic of Congo which aimed to improve the youth-friendliness of reproductive health services for adolescents.

Read more...

The MANI project was developed in 2015 to increase the survival chances of mothers and newborns by improving access to health services and promoting innovation for better maternal and newborn care. One of MANI’s interventions trains Traditional Birth Attendants (TBAs) to become Birth Companions, who refer and accompany pregnant women to health facilities for antenatal visits and delivery.

Read more...

By Alice Allan and Christina Wegs:

The Family Planning Summit, held in London on 11 July 2017, was a chance to re-energise support for global efforts to reach an additional 120 million women and girls with contraception information and services by 2020. Since the first Family Planning Summit in 2012, there has been progress towards that goal, with an additional 30.2 million women and girls able to have access to modern contraceptive methods. But there is still a long way to go and some major challenges to overcome – including the withdrawal of key donor funding from vital components of comprehensive sexual and reproductive health and rights through the US government’s Global Gag Rule – the elephant in the room at the Summit.

Read more...

In 2012, CARE joined other civil society organisations, governments and donors to commit to providing an additional 120 million women and girls with family planning information and services by 2020. This report reviews CARE's progress towards our 2020 Family Planning commitments.

Read more...
Page 1 of 5