Browse by Theme: Advocacy

CARE is adamant that the #MeToo movement should not go down in history as a flash in the pan, but that we must harness the moment to make it a significant milestone on the path towards gender equality. The agreement at the International Labour Conference (ILC) to establish a new, legally binding convention to ensure that abuse and harassment isn’t part of anyone’s job description, anywhere in the world, is a big step forward. We now have one year to ensure that this draft agreement is as strong as possible before the final vote next June.

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Will the parliamentary debate on refugee family reunion be a chance for the UK government to adopt a fairer approach? Right now in the UK, refugees who have been torn apart from their families by war and persecution continue to be separated from the people they love because of unfair and restrictive rules.

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This paper explores CARE’s work with social movements based on examples of CARE programming in different geographic and political contexts. It identifies the challenges and lessons associated with supporting social movements as a large international organisation.

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As we launch into 2018 it is worth reflecting that 2017 has not only seen some political upheavals in the UK and the US but also some fundamental social shifts. Whilst the revelations of sexual harassment and abuse of power from Hollywood to almost every workplace were not a surprise to some, they certainly got people talking about what is acceptable and gave people the confidence to come forward and share their #metoo experiences. So 2018 has to be the year we reinforce this cultural shift and secure some concrete changes in policy and practice when it comes to achieving gender justice at home and abroad.

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A six foot badger wanders among dozens of undistracted police holding a placard, “I am innocent”. Security is called to disperse a furious mob of septuagenarians barred entry from a sell-out Brexit event where Conservative Party darling, Jacob Rees-Mogg, is headlining. Katie Hopkins arrives bewilderingly, among the conference suits and ties, in a wedding dress. And then the PM’s speech… It was a party conference which might fairly be described as ‘surreal’.

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The domestic workers’ movement in Latin America has a long history of organizing dating back to the first decade of the 20th century. Thus, when CARE started engaging with domestic worker organizations as part of what would become the Dignified Work program (Trabajo Digno), it was entering a complex web of historical relationships, agendas, and existing organizations.

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The right to work for refugees is vital. In fact, increasing the economic opportunities for refugees is the only way in which they can become autonomous and productive, escape from long-term limbo and prevent them from being a burden on the state. But this is just one of the ways in which refugees can be supported, and providing the right to work is not an excuse for states to avoid their responsibilities to help people in need. Fundamentally, there needs to be political will and collaboration around a range of interventions and support to resolve refugee crises and an equitable resettlement arrangement should be a part of this.

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