Browse by Theme: Cash Transfer Programming

A summary of the learnings and recommendations from an internal and external evaluation of the Emergency Cash-First Response to Drought-Affected Communities in the Southern Provinces of Zimbabwe project which was carried out from August 2015 to May 2017.This programme is the first time that cash transfers have been used as a large-scale alternative to food aid in Zimbabwe and the first large-scale provision of cash transfers through mobile money.

Read more...

Cash transfers have gained significant momentum over the past few years. Various studies demonstrate that cash-based responses have the potential to support longer-term gains beyond consumption. For that reason, stakeholders in the humanitarian sector are increasingly exploring new ways to measure the breadth of changes that cash can generate in people’s lives, in particular related to households’ capacities to deal with shocks and stresses, manage risks and transform livelihoods to cope with hazards and opportunities.

Read more...

CARE and other INGOs are increasingly exploring cash transfer modalities both for emergency response and other multi-component interventions. Yet public and political pressures to demonstrate results are also increasing – and are leading implementing agencies to set up comprehensive monitoring systems and rigorous evaluation cycles.

Read more...

Cash programming has been under the cosh from certain sections of the media – so it will be interesting to see the response to the latest report from the Independent Commission for Aid Impact, published today (12 January 2017), which gives a strong endorsement to DFID’s cash programmes and how they deliver on poverty reduction.

Read more...

Conditional Cash Transfer (CCT) programmes support extremely poor households with a cash subsidy, on condition that children attend school and health checks. Evaluations have shown CCTs have succeeded in improving children’s school attendance, and nutritional and health indicators. But there is comparatively less evidence on whether CCTs address women’s needs and rights.

Read more...

Conditional cash transfer programmes provide extremely poor households with a cash subsidy, on condition that children attend school, and mothers and infants undergo health checks.

Read more...
Page 3 of 3