Browse by Theme: Advocacy

Understanding of the extent to which sexual harassment affects industries across the globe has increased exponentially. Numerous studies emphasise the frequency with which women experience violence and harassment at work. The Australian Human Rights Commission’s recent report on sexual harassment in the Australian workplace found that 1 in 3 women have experienced sexual harassment in the past five years. Emerging evidence in South-East Asia suggests this figure is higher than 1 in 2 in some industries. Such studies, combined with the spotlight shone on this topic by the #metoo movement, mean the prevalence of sexual harassment globally is undeniable. 

Read more...

Co-authored by Glen Tarman, CARE International’s Head of Global Advocacy, and Lisa Hadeed, CARE International’s Senior Communications Coordinator.

Movements like #MeToo, #YoTambién, #BalanceTonPorc, #NiUnaMenos and others have sparked widespread debate; violence and harassment against women is being exposed in more sectors, and the violence endured by women who are often less visible is gaining more attention. But there’s one debate taking place that more people should know about – here’s 5 reasons why...

Read more...

When it comes to Yemen, we are stuck in a waiting game, and expecting the worst. Two weeks ago, the UN announced that the country is on the brink of the world’s worst famine in 100 years, with 14 million civilians at risk of starvation.

Read more...

CARE’s advocacy team travelled to the party conferences this year with one goal: to build support for our #ThisIsNotWorking campaign. How many MPs could we get on board to push for a new global law to tackle workplace violence and harassment? Surely, we should only have bothered with TUC and Labour conferences if we wanted a workers’ rights issue to be met with open arms? But look a little closer and there was a decidedly receptive attitude in Birmingham to ending abuse in the world of work, as long as you knew where to look.

Read more...

As previously noted, the House of Commons Select Committee on International Development (IDC) has just published its report on DFID’s economic development strategy. In my earlier blog, I characterised the report as “lacking punch, misunderstanding gender but with some positives”. I want to highlight here one positive (as I see it), yet many of you might see it as a strange positive: DFID appear to be rowing back on the centrality of the ‘Asia model’ to their economic development strategy.

Read more...

The DFID-flagship Work and Opportunities for Women programme (WOW) has recently completed its inception phase and is now beginning implementation. The programme was originally conceived as a response to the UN High-Level panel report on women’s economic empowerment, which CARE broadly welcomed at the time. The programme is being run by an alliance of CARE, PwC, BSR, Social Development Direct and the University of Manchester, and aims to enhance the economic empowerment of 300,000 women by 2022.

Read more...

This week, the British and Kenyan Governments, together with the International Disability Alliance, co-host a Global Disability Summit. Over 700 delegates from governments, donors, private sector organisations, charities and organisations of persons with disabilities come together to launch a Charter for Change outlining ten pledges to transform global efforts on disability. When governments convene high-level Summits like this the question on everyone’s lips is always, what difference will this make the day after?

Read more...
Page 1 of 11