Browse by Theme: Food Security

This briefing note sets out detailed recommendations for the UN High level panel to consider as they begin to consider what might replace the Millennium Development Goals when they expire in 2015. CARE calls for a strong emphasis on gender and social equality, an integrated approach to poverty and climate change, and much much more!

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Evidence from the Bangladesh dairy sector demonstrates that strategically sourcing from and selling to low-income farmers helped businesses sustain reliable supply chains, enhance market opportunity, and ultimately increase profits.

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What changes do we need to empower women smallholders and achieve food security? This question has been asked repeatedly over the past several decades, but transformative changes in both public policy and practice have been few and far between. According to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO), closing the „gender gap‟ in agriculture – or increasing women‟s contribution to food production and enterprise by providing equal access to resources and opportunities – could reduce the number of hungry people in the world by 12-17 per cent, or by 100 to 150 million people.

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What changes do we need to empower women smallholders and achieve food security? This question has been asked repeatedly over the past several decades, but transformative changes in both public policy and practice have been few and far between. According to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO), closing the „gender gap‟ in agriculture – or increasing women‟s contribution to food production and enterprise by providing equal access to resources and opportunities – could reduce the number of hungry people in the world by 12-17 per cent, or by 100 to 150 million people.

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Three years after the 2007/2008 food price crisis, the cost of food items on both international and national markets are on the rise again.

Poor people, still suffering from the impact of the previous crisis, are being hit hardest. As well as the challenge of rising prices, agricultural commodity indices on both international and national markets have been increasingly volatile over the short-term – negatively impacting on both producers and consumers.

Assessments show that prices on international markets are likely to remain high for the foreseeable future.

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"Food insecurity is a growing concern throughout the developing world, particularly for poor women and children.

Estimates suggest that in 2010, approximately 925 million individuals were undernourished.1 While there have been some gains in reducing hunger globally, it remains a critical challenge, and it is unlikely that the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) to halve the proportion of people suffering from hunger by 20152 will be met.

A recent study on the future of food and farming identified six key drivers of change affecting the global food system: a growing global population; changing diets, notably an increase in demand for resource-intensive meat products;
food system governance, including globalisation of markets, subsidies and trade restrictions; competition for resources, particularly land, water and energy; consumer values and ethics; and the impacts of climate change.4 The combined effects of these pressures mean that increasing numbers of people will be at risk of hunger in the coming years.

While recognising that all of these drivers represent significant factors in achieving food security for all, this brief is focused on the impacts of climate change on food security in developing countries. Tackling this crisis will require unprecedented efforts on the part of the humanitarian and development community, researchers, governments, private sector and civil society organisations and farmers around the world. This brief outlines CARE’s understanding of the challenge and our response."

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This case study explores how CARE Kenya combined food security programming with an emerging market engagement strategy to decrease food shortages and increase incomes in western Kenya. With support from USAID, CARE implemented the Dak Achana project from 2004 to 2009. Over this period, the multi-component initiative succeeded in reducing the incidence of food shortages among the target area households from 86 percent in 2006 to 65 percent in 2008. The project has benefitted well over 100,000 Kenyans. These results are not insignificant in a region where 60 percent of the population lives in poverty and 90 percent of households depend on subsistence agriculture for their staple foods.

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