Building resilience in a complex environment

The 2011 food crisis in the Horn of Africa demonstrated that community resilience is more urgent than ever. Using evidence from a five year, cross border programme in Kenya, Ethiopia and Somalia, (RREAD) this paper aims to share evidence of approaches that work in building community resilience to shocks and stresses.

Key lessons for more effective natural resource management include, linking traditional knowledge with science and innovation, fostering inclusive local planning processes and improving access to markets to diversify livelihoods.

  • Countries: Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia
  • Published: October 2012

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