Migration, health and dignity in South Asia: Lessons from the EMPHASIS project on migration, women’s empowerment and HIV in Bangladesh, India and Nepal

This report on the EMPHASIS (Enhancing Mobile Populations’ Access to HIV and AIDS Services, Information and Support) project suggests that reaching cross-border migrants with information in their home countries and at their destinations can lead to safer mobility and positive health outcomes.

Other key findings include:

  • Creating an environment that safeguards the rights of migrants and ensures access to services, requires the enlistment of diverse stakeholders to create and maintain a chain of partnership across migration corridors.
  • Support for men’s and women’s solidarity groups across the mobility continuum can result in additional outcomes, including women’s political and economic empowerment, and a reduction in gender-based violence.
  • Health programming across borders and migration corridors – in South Asia and elsewhere - requires a robust and flexible monitoring system that is closely coordinated by all stakeholders and partners.
  • Programmes for cross-border migrants need to be open to grassroots feedback so that they can be adapted to changing circumstances and local needs.
  • Global stakeholders have a critical role to play in extracting and amplifying the core lessons gleaned from the EMPHASIS project, including re-thinking implementation methods for new or existing cross-border initiatives.

Authors: David Walker, Nabesh Bohidar, Prabodh Devkota

  • Countries: Bangladesh, India, Nepal
  • Co-authors: ODI, Big Lottery Fund
  • Published: July 2014

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