Monitoring and evaluation of cash transfer programmes for resilience

This study, drawing on monitoring and evaluation data for CARE cash transfer programmes in three countries (Zimbabwe, Niger and Ethiopia), provides analysis and recommendations on how the impact of CTPs on resilience can be better measured.

The study concludes that each of the four resilience capacities – anticipatory, absorptive, adaptive and transformative – are already integrated into monitoring and evaluation of the cash transfer programmes studied, but that improvements could be made in how these resilience capacities are measured across time and space. The study provides a set of recommendations for how to enhance the use of evidence in programme design.

  • Countries: Ethiopia, Niger, Zimbabwe, Global
  • Published: August 2017

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