Our Best Shot: Women frontline health workers in other countries are keeping you safe from COVID-19

This report argues that women frontline health workers – who deliver the ‘last mile’ of vaccination programmes and make vaccinations possible – do not get the protection, recognition, equality, and pay that they deserve. Vaccines are useless without delivery systems that depend on women frontline health workers, and global leaders and governments must protect, pay, and value women frontline health workers in order to ensure fast and fair vaccine delivery to at risk and underserved communities.

The report calculates that a comprehensive vaccine delivery strategy requires policy makers to invest $5 in delivery for every $1 spent on vaccines. Coming at a time when new and highly contagious variants of COVID-19 are emerging in countries that are struggling to access the vaccine and control the pandemic, the report adds that $2.50 must go to funding, training, equipping, and supporting health workers – especially women – who administer vaccines, run education campaigns, connect communities to health services, and build the trust required for patients to get vaccines.

  • Countries: Global
  • Published: March 2021

Related Publications

Stop Telling Half The Story: The UK government must deliver on women’s leadership in 2021

Women and girls’ priorities must be central to crisis response, and the best way to make this happen is to have them lead efforts to prevent and respond. This briefing paper sets out how and why the UK in 2021 must be a global champion for... Read more...


The 10 most under-reported humanitarian crises of 2020

CARE’s annual report highlighting the 10 most under-reported humanitarian crises of the year. The analysis reveals a concerning trend of crises – particularly on the African continent – being neglected year after... Read more...


Opening open government: Women’s rights organisations and the Open Government Partnership in the Philippines

This research was funded by the Feminist Open Government Initiative, which uses research and action to encourage governments and civil society to champion initiatives leading to gender advancements in and through open government. This includes... Read more...


Gender-based violence and COVID-19: The complexities of responding to ‘the shadow pandemic’

This CARE policy brief explores the unique factors of the COVID-19 pandemic that increase the risk of gender-based violence for girls and women, particularly in crisis-affected settings. The brief considers the implications for humanitarian and... Read more...


Sometimes we don’t even eat: How conflict and COVID-19 are pushing millions of people to the brink

This CARE report exposes how COVID-19 has exaggerated food insecurity in conflict-torn regions including Yemen, South Sudan, northeast Nigeria, and Democratic Republic of Congo. The report argues that unless urgent action is taken, repercussions... Read more...


Transforming leadership, challenging injustice: CARE’s approach to achieving women’s equal voice and leadership in public life and decision-making

Women’s marginalisation in public life and under-representation in decision-making and leadership perpetuates gender injustice. Supporting women to have a say in decisions that affect their lives is a strategy for achieving equitable and... Read more...