Browse by Theme: Livelihoods

South Sudan has endured many decades of violent conflict. To escape from the cycle of destruction and revenge, the Compromise Peace Agreement signed in August 2015 presents an opportunity for national authorities and the international community to adopt a new approach. This paper draws on CARE’s integrated approach to peacebuilding and economic development to argue that community reconciliation and economic development should be given equal weight in strategy decisions by national authorities, donors and aid agencies.

Read more...

Megan Gaventa writes: As I took part in CARE’s recent roundtable discussion, ‘Invisible Women in Global Value Chains: A Missed Opportunity?’, I couldn’t help but feel that the event was timely. Not just because it was part of CARE’s 70th anniversary celebrations. The excitement surrounding the launch of the Sustainable Development Goals – and their standalone goal on gender equality and women’s empowerment – was still fresh in the mind. Recent weeks had also brought the under-representation of women in business, politics and other spheres into the spotlight, as Elle’s photoshopped images of world leaders reminded us how far there is to go.

Read more...

Blog by Laurie Lee and Ramil Burden (Vice President, Africa and developing countries, GSK):

In the north eastern corner of Bangladesh lies Sunamganj district. A remote area that is underwater for almost half of the year, it is one of the hardest places in the country to be a mother. In 2012, only 11% of births were assisted by a skilled health worker compared to a third across the country, and the maternal mortality rate was double that of the nation as a whole.

Read more...

Poor people are producers, workers, entrepreneurs and consumers – yet they are the most disadvantaged in market systems. Why do so many people remain at the bottom of the pyramid, unable to participate equitably in markets and improve their livelihoods? What are the barriers to their progress? How can market actors – donors, private sector partners, governments and NGOs – work together to enable more people to participate in value chains?

Read more...

The private sector is a main actor involved in women’s economic empowerment in rural value chains: large traders, retailers or manufacturers often hold the keys to improving women’s access to extension services, financial services, input provision, market information and technology. They also have the negotiating power to help put gender equality on the agenda of producers’ associations and cooperatives.

Read more...

In recent years there’s been a steady stream of media articles questioning the benefits of microfinance, with some critics even arguing that not only does microfinance not benefit the poor, it actually makes them poorer. How should those of us involved in supporting the access of poor people to financial services respond? Is what we are doing actually helping the poor? Is the criticism of microfinance justified? Here are some personal thoughts.

Read more...

The Financing for Development Conference in Addis Ababa last week (13-16 July) got rather tepid and mixed reviews. Surprisingly, for a conference on financing, the outcome document contains very few numbers, and many NGOs are unhappy about the lack of funding commitments (including CARE), lack of a commitment to a new intergovernmental tax body, and a concern about the prominence of private financing (Oxfam, CAFOD, Christian Aid).

Read more...
Page 6 of 16