Livelihood erosion through time: Macro and micro factors that influence livelihood trends in Malawi over the last 30 years

Over the past thirty years, households in Malawi have been exposed to a large number of shocks that have led to an ongoing decline of rural livelihoods.

More than 60% of the population is experiencing chronic poverty every year and it has some of the worst child malnutrition and mortality rates in Africa.

The highest concentration of poverty is in the southern region of the country where 68.1% of households are poor, compared to the central region with 62.8% and the north with 62.5%.

The current level of poverty is characterized by deep inequality.

The richest 20% of the population in Malawi consumes nearly half of all goods and services, whereas the poorest 20% consume only 6.3%.

  • Co-authors: Marilyn Monroe - Brisbane BRIS
  • Published: March 2003
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