Lives Unseen: urban Syrian refugees and Jordanian host communities three years into the Syria crisis

With the Syria crisis entering its fourth year, the resources of many longer term Syrian refugees in Jordan are being depleted, while other Syrians are just arriving—often with few resources. With increasing needs, the capacities of Jordanian service providers, community-based organizations, and humanitarian actors are stretched. Setting the right programme priorities and identifying the most vulnerable households thus is now more important than ever to ensure different groups—particularly the most vulnerable Syrian men, women, girls, and boys—receive the assistance they need while awaiting return.

The present study aims to enhance all stakeholders’ understanding of the needs, vulnerabilities, and capacities of Syrian refugees and vulnerable hostcommunity members across the four urban areas in Jordan that host the largest number of refugees—Amman, Irbid, Mufraq, and Zarqa. The goal is to contribute to the growing data available by providing community views on needs, vulnerabilities, and capacities, as well as by identifying trends by comparing data with results from the two baseline studies that CARE conducted on the situation of urban refugees in Amman (2012) and in Irbid, Madaba, Mufraq, and Zarqa (2013). 

With the crisis becoming protracted, the effects on vulnerable host communities and on community relations increasingly demand all stakeholders’ attention. As the present study shows, Syrian refugees and vulnerable Jordanian families often share common concerns and needs, and they frequently extend support to each other. Therefore, midterm program options need to be developed that both help maintain community relations and ensure vulnerable Jordanian and Syrian families receive the support they need and do not feel they are competing over resources and access to services.

  • Countries: Jordan, Syrian Arab Republic
  • Published: April 2014

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