Browse by Theme: Financial Inclusion

In Sierra Leone, 91% of people are satisfied with the CARE response to Ebola, both in the immediate aftermath and in long-term recovery. It’s what a lot of people call Nexus programming: emergency response that also builds for the long term. In the words of one woman: “This has made us stronger and less worried since we know there is always a place to [get] money when it comes to unforeseen eventuality." Find out more about what we achieved. 

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As previously noted, the House of Commons Select Committee on International Development (IDC) has just published its report on DFID’s economic development strategy. In my earlier blog, I characterised the report as “lacking punch, misunderstanding gender but with some positives”. I want to highlight here one positive (as I see it), yet many of you might see it as a strange positive: DFID appear to be rowing back on the centrality of the ‘Asia model’ to their economic development strategy.

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Masuda, Shankori and Shilpi are entrepreneurial midwives who are improving health access in one of the most remote districts in Bangladesh, where maternal and under-5 mortality rates have fallen dramatically in recent years. These powerful women are also generating more income for their families and changing social norms. Having met them on a trip to Bangladesh, Kate Barwise considers what can be learned from their successes and how to support more women like them to help more communities.

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The SEEP Network’s SG2018: The Power of Savings Groups conference has ended and now the real work begins for the sector. More than 400 policy makers, company and development sector representatives came together in Kigali in May to step up the scale and impact of Savings Groups globally. One of the key learning events at SG2018 was provided by CARE’s POWER Africa project (Promoting Opportunities for Women’s Economic Empowerment in Rural Africa), and here we talk to two members of the POWER Africa team about what they took away from SG2018, and how they believe Savings Groups can be taken forward to empower more women in the future.

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Women in Malawi say that being able to open their own bank account or save with a VSLA has caused their husbands to be more engaged.

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In Egypt’s VSLAs, the number of women who have worried about money in the last 30 days has been cut nearly in half. Why? Because women are saving $58 a year now—2.7 times more than they used to. They are also able to take out loans, and are more than 6 times more likely to be involved in a business where they make money. 77% say their incomes have gone up.

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CARE's written evidence to the IDC argues that DFID’s Economic Development Strategy has an inadequate focus on gender and therefore will not deliver outcomes for women, companies and economies.

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