CARE International policy position on the Global Summit to End Sexual Violence in Conflict, June 2014

This policy brief calls on states, multilateral agencies and NGOs to commit to ending sexual violence in conflict by scaling up programmes engaging men and boys, funding frontline services for survivors of gender violence during emergencies, and creating clear National Action Plans on gender-based violence prevention and response.

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The brief welcomes the important focus of the Global Summit on impunity, but argues that ending sexual violence requires a more comprehensive approach. The brief presents evidence and analysis to support CARE International's position on:

  • Scaling up of innovative programmes to engage men and boys on gender equality and gender-based violence prevention, including the integration of teaching on these issues into the national education curriculum.
  • Translating the commitments in the 2013 'Call to Action on Violence Against Women and Girls in Emergencies' into bilateral donor policy and funding, including funding for sexual and reproductive health programmes in emergencies, and standardising the use of gender markers to hold aid agencies accountable.
  • Outlining clear and time-bound National Action Plans on gender-based violence prevention and response.
  • Published: May 2014

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