Not what she bargained for? Gender and the Grand Bargain

Ambitious plans to reform the humanitarian sector are still failing to reach grassroots women’s rights organisations or be felt by women affected by crises. As donors, UN agencies and NGOs review progress on the Grand Bargain, this paper outlines recommendations to promote women’s leadership and participation across the humanitarian reform agenda.

The paper focuses on the three Grand Bargain workstreams: localisation, participation and cash. Key recommendations include:

  • ensure ‘localised’ humanitarian funding reaches local women’s organisations and other civil society groups addressing gender issues
  • strengthen participation of local women’s groups in humanitarian coordination across all clusters
  • empower women to participate meaningfully and deliver on Accountability to Affected Populations and Prevention of Sexual Exploitation and Abuse
  • match the momentum on large‐scale and harmonised cash delivery with investment in the diverse strategies required to ensure gender-responsive approaches to cash programme quality, inclusion and accountability.
  • Countries: Global
  • Co-authors: Action Aid UK
  • Published: June 2018

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