Browse by Theme: Health

This report argues that strengthening local health systems should be a key focus of humanitarian health responses – bringing together humanitarian actors and local health workers to save lives in the short-term emergency response, and helping to build resilience and improve local health care provision in the longer term.

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This paper outlines CARE’s recommendations towards the G20 summit on 15-16 November 2014. The briefing paper focuses on issues of gender equality, climate change, financial inclusion, the Sustainable Development Goals, and the fight against Ebola.

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This short briefing paper outlines the key insights from the international conference on Women, Migration and Development jointly organised by CARE International, EMPHASIS and ODI in July 2014.

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This report provides a comprehensive overview of the EMPHASIS (Enhancing Mobile Populations’ Access to HIV/AIDS Services Information and Support) project, a 5-year project implemented in India, Nepal and Bangladesh addressing cross border mobility-related vulnerabilities, using an HIV lens and with a specific gender focus.

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This briefing presents the key messages and experiences from the 5-year EMPHASIS (Enhancing Mobile Populations’ Access to HIV and AIDS Services, Information and Support) project in Bangladesh, Nepal and India.

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This report on the EMPHASIS (Enhancing Mobile Populations’ Access to HIV and AIDS Services, Information and Support) project suggests that reaching cross-border migrants with information in their home countries and at their destinations can lead to safer mobility and positive health outcomes.

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This briefing presents findings from the the 5-year EMPHASIS project on migrants and HIV in Nepal, Bangladesh and India. Analysis of the project suggests that HIV and AIDS prevention programmes that focus on peer education for migrants within both their source and destination countries are vital to increase their knowledge on the risks of infection, reduce behaviour that increases these risks and expand their HIV-related service uptake.

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