‘I know I cannot quit’: The prevalence and productivity cost of sexual harassment to the Cambodian garment industry

This report presents the findings of a large-scale, nationally representative survey of sexual harassment in the Cambodian garment industry.

Based on quantitative and qualitative survey data, the study examines the harmful negative effects of sexual harassment in the workplace and estimates:

  • the prevalence of sexual harassment in the Cambodian garment industry
  • the annual cost of productivity lost to the garment industry due to sexual harassment

The study concludes with recommendations aimed at government and the garment industry.

  • Countries: Cambodia
  • Published: May 2017

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