Browse by Theme: Engaging Men & Boys

This week marks the one year anniversary of #MeToo, and the subsequent #AidToo movement. This transformed the global conversation, and put this critical issue high on the public agenda. I for one hope it stays there until we as a society and we as an industry overcome the power imbalances and gender inequality that underpin sexual exploitation, abuse and harassment.

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In Zimbabwe, mothers and school management worked to improve girls’ academic achievement through the Improving Girls’ Access through Transforming Education programme (IGATE). When you ask girls what they liked best about the initiative, many of them will tell you about the emergency skirt.

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Women in Malawi say that being able to open their own bank account or save with a VSLA has caused their husbands to be more engaged.

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#MeToo began with the bravery of individual women not willing to be silenced about their experiences of sexual harassment and abuse. Their voices have become a global movement exposing the systemic nature of sexism and male entitlement in all industries and countries. And, with #AidToo, #LabourToo and #MosqueMeToo, the movement has shown that no section of work or society is immune.

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At CARE we believe that a good humanitarian response has to respond to anyone in need, regardless of their gender. This comes with an understanding that greater priority must be given to women and girls due to entrenched gender inequalities. But when the world is impacted by an unprecedented refugee crisis and the vast majority of lone refugees are adolescent boys and men, are we really understanding and responding to their unique assistance and protection needs?

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Refugee women and children face specific risks and their needs are, quite rightly, highlighted and addressed by the humanitarian community. However, the situation and specific needs of single male refugees is often less understood. This report aims to address this information gap.

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Research shows that addressing intimate partner violence (IPV) requires working at society, community, household and individual levels to promote relationships built on respect, equality and peace. This blog shares the emerging learnings of working specifically with couples to address IPV in the context of Rwanda and speaks to the findings of the qualitative research conducted by Dr Erin Stern from London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (read more in this article by Dr Erin Stern and Ritha Nyiratunga).

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