Browse by Theme: Social Accountability

There is no classroom so you are teaching outside. The children are hungry and distracted. Most of them can’t read. There are no books, pens, paper. And you haven’t been paid this month. Unfortunately, this is too often the reality of teaching in Malawi – but a CARE project, giving parents and the community the tools to support the school and hold it to account, has turned the situation around. Here’s how they did it.

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In August this year, CARE International in Ghana together with its partners – OXFAM and ISODEC – commenced a pilot evaluation of the USAID-funded Ghana’s Strengthening Accountability Mechanisms (GSAM) project, using an innovative approach to impact evaluation called Contribution Tracing. Here’s what we did, and five key lessons we learned.

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In this final blog in the 3-part blog series on Contribution Tracing, we want to show you how an ancient monk, who has been dead for over 250 years, can help us to find data with the highest probative value – in other words, helps us find strong, reliable evidence.

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In the second in this 3-part blog series on Contribution Tracing we turn our attention to finding out which items of evidence are the most powerful.

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This 3-part blog series highlights a new approach to impact evaluation called Contribution Tracing. The blog series explains key steps in Contribution Tracing that can guide evaluators, and those commissioning evaluations, to avoid common data traps, by identifying and gathering only the strongest data.

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FP2020 has brought a powerful focus on family planning – but we must accelerate progress and fill key gaps to ensure we reach all people with the contraception/family planning services they want and need.

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On the plane to Accra just over a week ago I read Rebecca Solnit’s Men Explain Things to Me (the origin of the term “mansplaining”), and it struck a chord with me. A colleague from Kenya who hadn’t heard the term before asked if there was such a thing as “white-splaining”. And, indeed, there is. But, recently, I’ve been concerned with another phenomenon: “toolsplaining”.

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